UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF

THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

                         For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014                                                  Commission file number 1-10585

 

CHURCH & DWIGHT CO., INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

             

 

Delaware

 

13-4996950

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

500 Charles Ewing Boulevard, Ewing, N.J. 08628

(Address of principal executive offices)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (609) 806-1200

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange

on which registered

Common Stock, $1 par value

 

New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  T    No  £

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  £    No  T

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding twelve months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  T    No  £

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  T    No  £

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. £

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

T

 

Accelerated filer

£

 

Non-accelerated filer

£

 

Smaller reporting company

£

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  £    No  T

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2014 (the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter) was approximately $9.3 billion.  For purposes of making this calculation only, the registrant included all directors, executive officers and beneficial owners of more than ten percent of the common stock (the “Common Stock”) of Church & Dwight Co., Inc. (the “Company”).  The aggregate market value is based on the closing price of such stock on the New York Stock Exchange on June 30, 2014.

As of February 18, 2015, there were 130,566,502 shares of Common Stock outstanding.

Documents Incorporated by Reference

Certain provisions of the registrant’s definitive proxy statement to be filed not later than April 30, 2015 are incorporated by reference in Items 10 through 14 of Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10‑K (this “Annual Report”).  

 

 

 

 

 


CAUTIONARY NOTE ON FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

This Annual Report contains forward-looking statements, including, among others, statements relating to sales and earnings growth; the effect of product mix; volume growth, including the effects of new product launches into new and existing categories; the impact of unit dose laundry detergent; impairments and other charges; consumer demand and spending; the effects of competition; earnings per share; gross margin changes; trade and marketing spending; marketing expense as a percentage of net sales; cost savings programs; the Company’s hedge programs; the impact of foreign exchange and commodity price fluctuations; the Company’s share repurchase programs; the impact of acquisitions; capital expenditures; the effective tax rate; the impact of tax audits; tax changes and the lapse of applicable statutes of limitations; the impact of trade name impairment charges; environmental and regulatory matters; availability of raw materials; the effect of the credit environment on the Company’s liquidity and capital expenditures; the Company’s fixed rate debt; compliance with covenants under the Company’s Credit Agreement and other debt instruments; the Company’s commercial paper program; sufficiency of cash flows from operations; the Company’s current and anticipated future borrowing capacity to meet capital expenditure program costs; payment of dividends; actual voluntary and expected cash contributions to pension plans; investments in the Natronx Technologies, LLC (“Natronx”) joint venture; and adequacy of raw materials, including trona reserves. These statements represent the intentions, plans, expectations and beliefs of the Company, and are based on assumptions that the Company believes are reasonable but may prove to be incorrect.  In addition, these statements are subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors, many of which are outside the Company’s control and could cause actual results to differ materially from such forward-looking statements. Factors that might cause such differences include a decline in market growth, retailer distribution and consumer demand (as a result of, among other things, political, economic and marketplace conditions and events); unanticipated increases in raw material and energy prices; adverse developments affecting the financial condition of major customers and suppliers; competition, including The Procter & Gamble Company’s participation in the value laundry detergent category; changes in marketing and promotional spending; growth or declines in various product categories and the impact of customer actions in response to changes in consumer demand and the economy, including increasing shelf space of private label products; consumer and competitor reaction to, and customer acceptance of, new product introductions and features; disruptions in the banking system and financial markets; foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations; the impact of natural disasters on the Company and its customers and suppliers, including third party information technology service providers; the acquisition or divestiture of assets; the outcome of contingencies, including litigation, pending regulatory proceedings and environmental matters; and changes in the regulatory environment.

For a description of additional factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the forward looking statements, please see Item 1A, “Risk Factors” in this Annual Report.

The Company undertakes no obligation to publicly update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by the United States federal securities laws. You are advised, however, to consult any further disclosures the Company makes on related subjects in its filings with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Commission”).

 

 

 

2


TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I

Item

 

 

Page

 

1.

Business

 

4

 

1A.

Risk Factors

 

16

 

1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

25

 

2.

Properties

 

26

 

3.

Legal Proceedings

 

28

 

4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

 

29

 

PART II

 

5.

Market for the Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters, and Issuer Purchases of
Equity Securities

 

30

 

6.

Selected Financial Data

 

32

 

7.

Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

33

 

7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

 

51

 

8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

52

 

9.

Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

91

 

9A.

Controls and Procedures

 

91

 

9B.

Other Information

 

91

 

PART III

 

10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

92

 

11.

Executive Compensation

 

92

 

12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

92

 

13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

92

 

14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

 

92

 

PART IV

 

 

 

15.

Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedule

 

93

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3


 

PART I

 

ITEM 1.

BUSINESS

GENERAL

The Company, founded in 1846, develops, manufactures and markets a broad range of household, personal care and specialty products. The Company sells its consumer products under a variety of brands through a broad distribution platform that includes supermarkets, mass merchandisers, wholesale clubs, drugstores, convenience stores, home stores, dollar, pet and other specialty stores and websites, all of which sell the products to consumers. The Company also sells specialty products to industrial customers and distributors.

The Company focuses its consumer products marketing efforts principally on its nine “power brands.” These well-recognized brand names include ARM & HAMMER (used in multiple product categories such as baking soda, cat litter, carpet deodorization and laundry detergent), TROJAN condoms, lubricants and vibrators, OXICLEAN stain removers, cleaning solutions, laundry detergents, dishwashing detergent and bleach alternatives, SPINBRUSH battery-operated and manual toothbrushes, FIRST RESPONSE home pregnancy and ovulation test kits, NAIR depilatories, ORAJEL oral analgesics and XTRA laundry detergent. The ninth “power brand” is the combination of the L’IL CRITTERS and VITAFUSION brand names for the Company’s gummy dietary supplement business. The Company considers four of these brands to be “mega brands”: ARM & HAMMER, OXICLEAN, TROJAN and L’IL CRITTERS and VITAFUSION, and is giving greatest focus to the growth of these brands.

The Company’s business is divided into three primary segments: Consumer Domestic, Consumer International and Specialty Products Division (“SPD”). The Consumer Domestic segment includes the power brands noted previously as well as other household and personal care products such as SCRUB FREE, KABOOM and ORANGE GLO cleaning products, ARRID antiperspirant and CLOSE-UP and AIM toothpastes and SIMPLY SALINE nasal saline moisturizer. The Consumer International segment primarily sells a variety of personal care products, some of which use the same brands as the Company’s domestic product lines, in international markets, including Canada, France, Australia, the United Kingdom, Mexico and Brazil. The SPD segment is the largest United States (“U.S.”) producer of sodium bicarbonate, which it sells together with other specialty inorganic chemicals for a variety of industrial, institutional, medical and food applications. This segment also sells a range of animal nutrition and specialty cleaning products. In 2014, the Consumer Domestic, Consumer International and SPD segments represented approximately 75%, 16% and 9%, respectively, of the Company’s net sales.  

All domestic brand “rankings” contained in this Annual Report are based on dollar share rankings from ACNielsen AOC (All Outlets Combined) for the 52 weeks ended December 21, 2014.  Foreign brand “rankings” are derived from several sources.  

FINANCIAL INFORMATION ABOUT SEGMENTS

As noted above, the Company’s business is organized into three reportable segments: Consumer Domestic, Consumer International and SPD.  These segments are based on differences in the nature of products and organizational and ownership structures.  The businesses of these segments generally are not seasonal, although the Consumer Domestic and Consumer International segments are affected by sales of SPINBRUSH battery-operated toothbrushes (which typically are higher during the fall, in advance of the holiday season), sales of NAIR depilatories and waxes (which typically are higher in the spring and summer months), and sales of VITAFUSION and L’IL CRITTERS dietary supplements (which typically are slightly higher in the fourth quarter of each year, in advance of the cold and flu season and renewed commitments to health).  Information concerning each of the segments is set forth in Note 17 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report and in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” which is Item 7 of this Annual Report.  

CONSUMER PRODUCTS

Consumer Domestic

Principal Products

The Company’s founders first marketed baking soda in 1846 for use in home baking.  Today, this product has a wide variety of uses in the home, including as a refrigerator and freezer deodorizer, scratch-free cleaner and deodorizer for kitchen surfaces and cooking appliances, bath additive, dentifrice, cat litter deodorizer and swimming pool pH stabilizer.  The Company specializes in baking soda-based products, as well as other products which use the same raw materials or technology or are sold in the same markets.  In addition, this segment includes other deodorizing and household cleaning products, as well as laundry and personal care products.  The following table sets forth the principal products of the Company’s Consumer Domestic segment.

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Type of Product

 

Key Brand Names

 

 

 

Household

 

ARM & HAMMER Baking Soda

 

 

ARM & HAMMER Carpet Deodorizers

 

 

ARM & HAMMER Cat Litter Deodorizer

 

 

ARM & HAMMER Clumping Cat Litters (including CLUMP & SEAL)

 

 

ARM & HAMMER Powder, Liquid and Unit Dose Laundry Detergents

 

 

ARM & HAMMER Super Washing Soda

 

 

ARM & HAMMER FRESH’N SOFT Fabric Softeners

 

 

CLEAN SHOWER Daily Shower Cleaner

 

 

FELINE PINE Cat Litter

 

 

KABOOM Cleaning Products

 

 

NICE’N FLUFFY Fabric Softeners

 

 

ORANGE GLO Cleaning Products

 

 

OXICLEAN Dishwashing Detergent and Dishwashing Booster

 

 

OXICLEAN Laundry and Cleaning Solutions

  

 

SCRUB FREE Bathroom Cleaners

 

 

XTRA Fabric Softeners

 

 

XTRA Powder and Liquid Laundry Detergents

 

 

 

Personal Care

 

AIM Toothpaste

 

 

ANSWER Home Pregnancy and Ovulation Test Kits

 

 

ARM & HAMMER Deodorants and Antiperspirants

 

 

ARM & HAMMER TRULY RADIANT Toothpaste and Oral Rinses

 

 

ARRID Antiperspirants

 

 

CLOSE-UP Toothpaste

 

 

FIRST RESPONSE Home Pregnancy and Ovulation Test Kits

 

 

L’IL CRITTERS Dietary Supplements

 

 

MENTADENT Toothpaste and Toothbrushes

 

 

NAIR Depilatories, Lotions, Creams and Waxes

 

 

ORAJEL Oral Analgesics

 

 

PEPSODENT Toothpaste

REPHRESH Feminine Hygiene Product

REPLENS Feminine Hygiene Product

 

 

SIMPLY SALINE Nasal Saline Moisturizer

 

 

SPINBRUSH Battery-operated Toothbrushes

 

 

TROJAN Condoms, Lubricants and Vibrating Products

 

 

VITAFUSION Dietary Supplements

Household Products

In 2014, household products constituted approximately 59% of the Company’s Domestic Consumer sales and approximately 45% of the Company’s total sales.  

The ARM & HAMMER trademark was adopted in 1867.  ARM & HAMMER Baking Soda remains the number one leading brand of baking soda in terms of consumer recognition of the brand name and reputation for quality and value.  The deodorizing properties of baking soda have led to the development of several baking soda-based household products.  For example, the Company markets ARM & HAMMER FRIDGE FRESH, a refrigerator deodorizer equipped with a baking soda filter to help keep food tasting fresher, and ARM & HAMMER Carpet Deodorizer.    

The Company’s laundry detergents constitute its largest consumer business, measured by net sales. The Company markets its ARM & HAMMER brand laundry detergents in powder, liquid and unit dose forms as value products, priced at a discount from products identified by the Company as market leaders. The Company markets its XTRA laundry detergent in both powder and liquid forms at a slightly lower price than ARM & HAMMER brand laundry detergents. The Company also markets XTRA LASTING SCENTSATIONS and XTRA FRESCO SCENTSATIONS, a line of highly fragranced and concentrated liquid laundry detergents, and OXICLEAN laundry stain fighting additives   OXICLEAN is the number one brand in the U.S. laundry stain fighting additive market. The Company markets ARM & HAMMER PLUS OXICLEAN liquid and powder laundry detergents, combining the benefits of these two powerful laundry detergent products, and ARM & HAMMER CRYSTAL BURST unit dose laundry detergent. In 2014, the Company launched ARM & HAMMER PLUS OXICLEAN Ultra Power liquid detergent, an ultra-concentrated version of

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ARM & HAMMER PLUS OXICLEAN, ARM & HAMMER CLEAN SCENTSATIONS, a line of liquid detergents with fragrances inspired by U.S. National Parks, OXICLEAN laundry detergent, a premium-priced line of liquid, powder and unit dose laundry detergents, OXICLEAN dishwashing detergent, and OXICLEAN WHITE REVIVE additive, a line of bleach alternatives in both powder and unit dose forms. In 2015, the Company is introducing ARM & HAMMER PLUS OXICLEAN ODOR BLASTERS liquid laundry detergent, ARM & HAMMER CLEAN SCENTSATIONS scent booster, OXICLEAN WHITE REVIVE laundry detergent and liquid additive, OXICLEAN versatile stain remover plus ODOR BLASTERS, and OXICLEAN washing machine cleaner.

The Company’s laundry products also include fabric softener sheets that prevent static cling and soften and freshen clothes. The Company markets ARM & HAMMER FRESH’N SOFT fabric softeners and offers a liquid fabric softener, NICE’N FLUFFY, at a slightly lower price enabling the Company to compete at several price points.  

The Company also markets a line of cat litter products, including ARM & HAMMER CLUMP & SEAL clumping cat litter, ARM & HAMMER SUPER SCOOP clumping cat litter and ARM & HAMMER ULTRA LAST, a longer lasting clumping cat litter. Other products include ARM & HAMMER Multi-Cat cat litter, designed for households with more than one cat, ARM & HAMMER ESSENTIALS clumping cat litter, a corn-based scoopable litter made for consumers who prefer to use products made with natural ingredients, and ARM & HAMMER Double Duty cat litter, which eliminates both urine and feces odors on contact. The Company markets its FELINE PINE cat litter in the natural litter segment, complementing the Company’s ARM & HAMMER branded cat litter business and positioning the Company as a leading supplier of natural cat litter. In December 2014, the Company launched ARM & HAMMER CLUMP & SEAL lightweight cat litter and in 2015, the Company will launch ARM & HAMMER CLUMP & SEAL NATURALS cat litter.  

In addition, the Company markets a line of household cleaning products including CLEAN SHOWER daily shower cleaner, and SCRUB FREE bathroom cleaners. The Company also markets KABOOM bathroom cleaners, ORANGE GLO household cleaning products and OXICLEAN Dishwashing Booster, which removes cloudy film and food particles on glasses and dishes. In 2014, the Company introduced KABOOM SHOWER GUARD, a daily shower cleaning product, and extended its OXICLEAN brand by launching its first OXICLEAN automatic dishwasher dishwashing detergent.

Personal Care Products

The Company’s personal care business was founded on the unique strengths of its ARM & HAMMER trademark and baking soda technology. The Company has expanded its personal care business through its acquisition of antiperspirants, oral care products, depilatories, reproductive health products, oral analgesics, nasal saline moisturizers and dietary supplements under a variety of other leading brand names. In 2014, Personal Care Products constituted approximately 41% of the Company’s Consumer Domestic sales and approximately 30% of the Company’s total sales.

ARM & HAMMER Baking Soda, when used as a dentifrice, helps whiten and polish teeth, removes plaque and leaves the mouth feeling fresh and clean. These properties led to the development of a complete line of sodium bicarbonate-based dentifrice products that are marketed and sold nationally primarily under the ARM & HAMMER DENTAL CARE and ARM & HAMMER ADVANCE WHITE brand names, including a line of toothpaste for sensitive teeth under the ARM & HAMMER brand.

The Company also manufactures in the U.S. and markets in the U.S. (including Puerto Rico) and Canada CLOSE-UP, PEPSODENT and AIM toothpastes, which are priced at a discount from the market leaders, and the MENTADENT brand of toothpaste and toothbrushes. In addition, the Company markets deodorant and antiperspirant products under the ARM & HAMMER and ARRID brand names.

Condoms are recognized as highly reliable contraceptives as well as an effective means of reducing the risk of sexually transmitted diseases. The Company’s TROJAN condom brand is the number one condom brand in the U.S., and has been in use for more than 90 years. The brand includes such products as ECSTASY, TROJAN EXTENDED PLEASURE, HER PLEASURE, TWISTED PLEASURE, MAGNUM and FIRE & ICE, TROJAN CHARGED, a condom with a sensate lubricant that has heating, cooling and tingling properties, and TROJAN Vibrations, a line of vibrating products. The Company also markets a line of lubrication products under the TROJAN brand. In 2014, the Company introduced line extensions into the TROJAN lubricant line, launched two new condoms: TROJAN DOUBLE ECSTASY and TROJAN MAGNUM RIBBED and introduced two new vibrating products under its TROJAN Vibrations line. In 2015, the Company is introducing TROJAN STUDDED BARESKIN and MAGNUM BARESKIN condoms and TROJAN TONIGHT and TROJAN H2O lubricants.

The Company markets SPINBRUSH battery-operated toothbrushes in the U.S. (including Puerto Rico), the United Kingdom, Canada, France, China and Australia. In 2014, the SPINBRUSH battery-operated toothbrush was the number one leading brand of battery-operated toothbrushes in the U.S. The Company also markets SPINBRUSH PROCLEAN toothbrushes, a two-speed version of the product, SPINBRUSH PROCLEAN Recharge, a rechargeable toothbrush offering up to one week of power brushes between

6


 

charges, SPINBRUSH PROCLEAN Sonic, a value high speed battery-operated toothbrush which competes with much more expensive “sonic” toothbrushes, and ARM & HAMMER TOOTH TUNES battery-operated toothbrushes, with proprietary technology that delivers music while brushing. In 2014, the Company introduced a line of SPINBRUSH TRULY RADIANT toothpastes. In 2015, the Company is introducing a line of ARM & HAMMER SPINBRUSH manual toothbrushes with rotating heads as well as ARM & HAMMER TRULY RADIANT oral rinse.

The Company markets two lines of home pregnancy and ovulation test kits. Its FIRST RESPONSE brand of diagnostic kits is the number one selling brand in the U.S. Its ANSWER home pregnancy and ovulation test kits compete in the value segment of the market. In 2014, the Company launched an enhanced FIRST RESPONSE pregnancy test kit that can tell a woman that she is pregnant up to six days before her expected period, with 99% accuracy from the day of her missed period. In 2015, the Company will launch a new stick design for its FIRST RESPONSE pregnancy test kit and an ovulation test and confirm kit.

The Company’s NAIR hair-removal brand is the number one selling depilatory brand in the U.S., with innovative products that address consumer needs for quick, complete and longer-lasting hair removal.  The Company offers a full line of depilatory products for women and men under the NAIR brand name, including NAIR SHOWER POWER, SPRAYS AWAY, and the Moroccan Argan Oil line of depilatories and waxes.  In 2015, the Company is introducing three new NAIR Moroccan Argan Oil hair-removal products, building on the success of the lines which were introduced in 2014.

The Company markets ORAJEL oral analgesics, which includes products for adults as well as babies, including ORAJEL Cooling Cucumber Teething Gel and BABY ORAJEL Tooth and Gum Cleanser. The ORAJEL teething and toothache line of products is the number one brand in the U.S. In 2014, the Company introduced several teething and toothache line extensions with licensed characters under the ORAJEL trademark. In 2015, the Company is introducing ORAJEL alcohol free mouth sore rinse.

The Company markets and sells the L’IL CRITTERS children’s gummy dietary supplement line and the VITAFUSION adult gummy dietary supplement line, both number one leading brands in the gummy-form dietary supplement category. The Company also markets and sells a line of gummy probiotics under the ACCUFLORA brand name, and private label gummy dietary supplements. In 2014, the Company introduced two new lines of gummy dietary supplements: VITAFUSION MULTIVITES PLUS and L’IL CRITTERS GUMMY VITES PLUS. In 2015, the Company is introducing VITAFUSION EXTRA STRENGTH line extensions and FIRST RESPONSE reproductive health dietary supplements.  

The Company markets the SIMPLY SALINE brand of nasal saline moisturizers in the U.S., complementing the Company’s STERIMAR brand nasal saline solution business in Europe and other parts of the world. The Company also markets BATISTE dry shampoo in the U.S.

In 2014, the Company acquired the feminine care brands REPHRESH and REPLENS as part of the acquisition of the Lil’ Drug Store products.

Consumer International

The Consumer International segment markets a variety of personal care products, household and over-the-counter products in international markets, including Canada, France, Australia, China, the United Kingdom, Mexico and Brazil.  Export sales from the U.S. are included in this segment.  

Total Consumer International net sales represented approximately 16% of the Company’s consolidated net sales in 2014.  Net sales of the businesses located in Europe, Canada, Australia and Mexico accounted for 35%, 34%, 10% and 10%, respectively, of the Company’s 2014 international net sales in this segment.  No other country in which the Company operates accounts for more than 10% of its total international net sales and no product line accounts for more than 15% of total international net sales.  

Certain of the Company’s international product lines are similar to its domestic product lines and many are unique. For example, the Company markets its ARM & HAMMER and OXICLEAN laundry products and TROJAN condoms in Canada and Mexico, ARM & HAMMER cat litter in Canada, home pregnancy and ovulation test kits and oral care products in most of its international markets, waxes and depilatory products in virtually all international locations and L’IL CRITTERS and VITAFUSION gummy dietary supplements principally in Canada and Asia.  

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The Company also markets SPINBRUSH battery-operated toothbrushes internationally, primarily in the United Kingdom, Canada, France, China and Australia.  The Company sells STERIMAR nasal hygiene products in a number of markets in Europe, as well as in Mexico, parts of Asia and Australia and other international markets. The Company also sells BATISTE dry shampoo principally in the United Kingdom, where it is the number one selling dry shampoo, Australia, Canada, France, Brazil, China and Mexico, as well as other markets including the United States. The Company also markets the CURASH line of babycare products in Australia, and GRAVOL anti-nauseant and RUB-A535 topical analgesic in Canada and other international markets.

COMPETITION FOR CONSUMER DOMESTIC AND CONSUMER INTERNATIONAL

The Company competes in the household and personal care consumer product categories, which are highly innovative categories, characterized by a continuous flow of new products and line extensions, and require significant advertising and promotion. The Company competes in these categories primarily on the basis of product innovation and performance, brand recognition, price, value and other consumer benefits. Consumer products, particularly laundry and household cleaning products, as well as certain toothpaste products, are subject to significant price competition. As a result, the Company from time to time may need to reduce the prices for some of its products to respond to competitive and customer pressures and to maintain market share.  

Internationally, the Company competes in similar competitive categories for most of its products.  

The Company’s competitors include The Procter & Gamble Company (“P&G”), The Sun Products Corporation, The Clorox Company, Colgate-Palmolive Company, S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc., Nestle Purina PetCare Company, Henkel AG & Co. KGaA, Reckitt Benckiser Group plc, Johnson & Johnson, Ansell Limited, Pfizer Inc., Bayer AG, Alere Inc., NBTY, Inc. and Pharmavite LLC. Many of these companies have greater financial resources than the Company and have the capacity to outspend the Company if they attempt to gain market share.  

Product introductions typically involve heavy marketing and trade spending in the year of launch, and the Company usually is not able to determine whether the new products and line extensions will be successful until a period of time has elapsed following the introduction of the new products or the extension of the product line.

Because of the competitive environment facing retailers, the Company faces pricing pressure from customers, particularly high-volume retailer store customers, who have increasingly sought to obtain pricing concessions or better trade terms. These concessions or terms could reduce the Company’s margins. Furthermore, if the Company is unable to maintain price or trade terms acceptable to its customers, they could increase product purchases from competitors and reduce purchases from the Company, which would harm the Company’s sales and profitability.  

DISTRIBUTION FOR CONSUMER DOMESTIC

Products in the Consumer Domestic segment are marketed throughout the U.S. primarily through a broad distribution platform that includes supermarkets, mass merchandisers, wholesale clubs, drugstores, convenience stores, home stores, dollar, pet and other specialty stores, and websites, all of which sell the products to consumers. The Company employs a sales force based regionally throughout the U.S. and utilizes the services of independent food brokers, who represent the Company’s products in the food, mass, pet, dollar and club, as well as numerous other classes of trade. The Company’s products are stored in Company plants and third-party owned warehouses and are either delivered by independent trucking companies or picked up by customers at the Company’s facilities.  

DISTRIBUTION FOR CONSUMER INTERNATIONAL

Products in the Consumer International segment are sold broadly across retail platforms that include supermarkets, wholesale clubs, pharmacies and drugstores, convenience stores, discount stores and websites, all of which sell the products to consumers. The Company’s Consumer International distribution network is well-established and varies according to the needs of each market.  Subsidiary countries primarily utilize internal warehousing and distribution capabilities that enable direct shipment to key retailers.  Export markets primarily rely upon third party suppliers to market, warehouse and distribute products to end customers.  


8


 

Specialty Products Division

Principal Products

The Company’s SPD segment focuses on sales to businesses and participates in three product areas: Specialty Chemicals, Animal Nutrition and Specialty Cleaners, and accounted for approximately 9% of the Company’s consolidated net sales in 2014.  The following table sets forth the principal products of the Company’s SPD segment.

 

Type of Product

 

Key Brand Names

Specialty Chemicals

 

ARM & HAMMER Performance Grade Sodium Bicarbonate

 

 

ARMAND PRODUCTS COMPANY Potassium Carbonate and Potassium Bicarbonate(1)

 

 

Enprove Ground Trona (2)

 

 

Enprove Sodium Bicarbonate (2)

 

 

 

Animal Nutrition

 

ARM & HAMMER Feed Grade Sodium Bicarbonate

 

 

BIO-CHLOR and FERMENTEN Rumen Fermentation Enhancers

 

 

DCAD PLUS Feed Grade Potassium Carbonate (3)

 

 

MEGALAC Rumen Bypass Fat (4)

 

 

MEGALAC -R Omega 3 & Omega 6 Essential Fatty Acids (4)

 

 

MEGAMINE-L, Rumen Bypass Lysine

 

 

SQ-810 Natural Sodium Sesquicarbonate

 

 

CELMANAX  Refined Functional Carbohydrate (6)

 

 

 

Specialty Cleaners

 

ARMAKLEEN Commercial & Professional Aqueous Cleaners (5)

 

 

ARMEX Blast Media (5)

 

 

Commercial & Professional Cleaners and Deodorizers

 

 

 

(1)

Manufactured and marketed by Armand Products Company (“Armand”), a joint venture in which the Company holds a 50% interest.  

(2)

Distributed and marketed by Natronx, a joint venture in which the Company holds a one-third ownership interest.  Enprove is a registered trademark of FMC Corporation (“FMC”) that has been assigned to Natronx with the right of reversion to FMC upon a Natronx dissolution.

(3)

Manufactured for the Company by Armand.  

(4)

MEGALAC is a registered trademark of Volac International Limited.

(5)

Distributed in North America by The ArmaKleen Company (“ArmaKleen”), a joint venture in which the Company holds a 50% ownership interest.  

(6)

Acquired as part of the VI-COR acquisition in January 2015.

Specialty Chemicals

The Company’s specialty chemicals business primarily encompasses the manufacture, marketing and sale of sodium bicarbonate in a range of grades and granulations for use in industrial markets. In industrial markets, sodium bicarbonate is used by other manufacturing companies as a leavening agent for commercial baked goods, as an antacid in pharmaceuticals, as a carbon dioxide release agent in fire extinguishers, as an alkaline agent in swimming pool chemicals, and as a buffer in kidney dialysis.  

The Company’s Brazilian subsidiary, Quimica Geral do Nordeste (“QGN”), markets sodium bicarbonate in Brazil and is South America’s leading provider of sodium bicarbonate.  

The Company and Occidental Chemical Corporation are equal partners in a joint venture, Armand, which manufactures and markets potassium carbonate and potassium bicarbonate for sale in domestic and international markets. The potassium-based products are used in a wide variety of applications, including agricultural products, specialty glass and ceramics, and potassium silicates. Armand also manufactures for the Company a potassium carbonate-based animal feed additive for sale in the dairy industry, described below under “Animal Nutrition Products.”

The Company, FMC and TATA Chemicals (Soda Ash) Partners are equal partners in Natronx. The Company’s investment is accounted for under the equity method. Natronx engages in the marketing and distribution of sodium-based, dry sorbents for air pollution control in electric utility and industrial boiler operations. The sorbents, primarily sodium bicarbonate and trona, are used by coal-fired utilities to remove harmful pollutants, such as acid gases, in flue-gas treatment processes.  

9


 

Animal Nutrition Products

A special grade of sodium bicarbonate, as well as sodium sesquicarbonate, is sold to the animal feed market as a feed additive for use by the dairy industry as a buffer, or antacid, for dairy cattle. The Company also markets DCAD PLUS feed grade potassium carbonate, which is manufactured by Armand as a feed additive into the animal feed market.  

The Company markets MEGALAC rumen bypass fat, a nutritional supplement made from natural oils, which enables cows to maintain energy levels during the period of high milk production, resulting in improved milk yields and minimized weight loss. The product and the trademark Megalac are licensed under a long-term license agreement from a British company, Volac International Limited.

The Company also markets BIO-CHLOR and FERMENTEN, a range of specialty feed ingredients for dairy cows, which improve rumen feed efficiency and help increase milk production.

On January 2, 2015, the Company acquired certain assets of Varied Industries Corporation (the “VI-COR Acquisition”) a manufacturer and seller of feed ingredients for cows, beef cattle, poultry and other livestock, including CELMANAX Refined Functional Carbohydrate and other feed additives for sale in domestic and international markets and used to promote livestock digestive health and performance.

Specialty Cleaners

The Company also provides a line of cleaning and deodorizing products for use in commercial and industrial applications such as office buildings, hotels, restaurants and other facilities.

The Company and Safety-Kleen Systems, Inc. (“Safety-Kleen”) are equal partners in a joint venture, ArmaKleen, which has built a specialty cleaning products business based on the Company’s technology and Safety-Kleen’s sales and distribution organization. In North America, this joint venture distributes the Company’s proprietary product line of aqueous cleaners along with the Company’s ARMEX blast media line, which is designed for the removal of a wide variety of surface coatings.

COMPETITION FOR SPD

Competition within the specialty chemicals and animal nutrition product lines is intense. The specialty chemicals business operates in a competitive environment influenced by capacity utilization, customers’ leverage and the impact of raw material and energy costs. Product introductions typically involve introductory costs in the year of launch, and the Company usually is not able to determine whether new products and line extensions will be successful until a period of time has elapsed following the introduction of new products or the extension of the product lines. The Company’s key competitors are Solvay Chemicals, Inc., FMC and Natural Soda, Inc.

DISTRIBUTION FOR SPD

SPD markets sodium bicarbonate and other chemicals to industrial and agricultural customers primarily throughout the U.S. and Canada. Distribution is accomplished through a dedicated sales force supplemented by manufacturers’ representatives and the sales personnel of independent distributors throughout the country. The Company’s products in this segment are located in Company plants and public warehouses and are either delivered by independent trucking companies or picked up by customers at the Company’s facilities.

RAW MATERIALS AND SOURCES OF SUPPLY

The Company manufactures sodium bicarbonate for both its consumer and specialty products businesses at its plants located at Green River, Wyoming and Old Fort, Ohio. The primary source of soda ash, a basic raw material used by the Company in the production of sodium bicarbonate, is the mineral trona, which is found in abundance in southwestern Wyoming near the Company’s Green River plant. The Company has adequate trona reserves under mineral leases to support the Company’s sodium bicarbonate requirements for the foreseeable future.

The Company is party to a partnership agreement with Tata Chemicals (Soda Ash) Partners, which mines and processes trona reserves in Wyoming. Through the partnership and related supply and services agreements, the Company fulfills a substantial amount of its soda ash requirements, enabling the Company to achieve some of the economies of an integrated business capable of producing

10


 

sodium bicarbonate and related products from the basic raw material. The Company also has an agreement for the supply of soda ash from another company. The partnership agreement and other supply agreements between the Company and Tata Chemicals (Soda Ash) Partners are terminable upon two years notice by either company. The Company believes that sufficient alternative sources of supply are available.

The Company believes that ample sources of raw materials are available for all of its other major products. Detergent chemicals are used in a variety of the Company’s products and are available from a number of sources. Bottles, paper products and clay are available from multiple suppliers, although the Company chooses to source most of these materials from single sources under long-term supply agreements in order to gain favorable pricing. The Company also uses a palm oil fraction (by-product) in its rumen bypass fats products. Alternative sources of supply are available in case of disruption or termination of the supply agreements.

The cost of raw materials, including surfactants, diesel fuel and oil-based raw and packaging materials used primarily in the consumer businesses, continued to be high in 2014 relative to prior years. However, while the market price of ethylene-based resin was at an all-time high in 2014, the Company’s cost for this material was partially mitigated as a result of the Company’s ability to contractually lock in pricing for 2014. Increases in the prices of certain raw materials could materially impact the Company’s costs and financial results if the Company is unable to pass such costs along in the form of price increases to its customers.

The Company utilizes the services of third party contract manufacturers around the world for certain products.  

PATENTS AND TRADEMARKS

The Company’s trademarks appear in upper case letters throughout this Annual Report. The majority of the Company’s trademarks are registered with either the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office or with the trademark offices of many foreign countries. The ARM & HAMMER trademark has been used by the Company since 1867, and is a valuable asset and important to the successful operation of the Company’s business. The Company’s products are sold under many other valuable trademarks held by the Company, including TROJAN, NAIR, ORAJEL, FIRST RESPONSE, XTRA, OXICLEAN, SPINBRUSH, BATISTE, SIMPLY SALINE, FELINE PINE, L’IL CRITTERS, VITAFUSION, REPHRESH and REPLENS. The Company’s portfolio of trademarks represents substantial goodwill in the businesses using the trademarks.

U.S. patents are currently granted for a term of 20 years from the date the patent application is filed. Although the Company actively seeks and maintains a number of patents, no single patent is considered significant to the business as a whole.  

CUSTOMERS AND ORDER BACKLOG

In each of the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013, and 2012, net sales to the Company’s largest customer, Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. and its affiliates (“Wal-Mart”), were 25%, 24% and 24% respectively, of the Company’s total consolidated net sales.  The time between receipt of orders and shipment is generally short, and as a result, backlog is not significant.  No other customer accounted for 10% or more of consolidated net sales in the three-year period.

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

The Company conducts research and development activities primarily at its Princeton and Cranbury facilities in New Jersey.  The Company devotes significant resources and attention to product development, process technology and basic research to develop differentiated products with new and distinctive features and to provide increased convenience and value to its customers.  To increase its innovative capabilities, the Company engages outside contractors for general research and development in activities beyond its core areas of expertise.  The Company spent $59.8 million, $61.8 million and $54.8 million on research and development activities in 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

GOVERNMENT REGULATION

General

Some of the Company’s products are subject to regulation by one or more U.S. agencies, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”), the Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”), the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”), the Consumer Product Safety Commission (“CPSC”) and foreign agencies.  

FDA regulations govern a variety of matters relating to the Company’s products, such as product development, manufacturing, premarket clearance or approval, advertising and distribution. The regulations adopted and standards imposed by the FDA and similar

11


 

foreign agencies evolve over time and can require the Company to make changes in its manufacturing processes and quality systems to remain in compliance. These agencies periodically inspect manufacturing and other facilities. If the Company fails to comply with applicable regulations and standards, it may be subject to sanctions, including fines and penalties, the recall of products and cessation of manufacturing and/or distribution.  

In addition, the Company sells products that are subject to regulation under the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act and the Toxic Substances Control Act, which are administered by the EPA. The Company also is subject to regulation by the FTC in connection with the content of its labeling, advertising, promotion, trade practices and other matters.

The CPSC administers the Poison Prevention Packaging Act, and has issued regulations requiring special child resistant packaging for certain products, including pharmaceuticals, dietary supplements, and dietary substances, containing certain ingredients (e.g., iron).

The Company’s relationship with certain union employees may be overseen by the National Labor Relations Board. The Company’s activities also are regulated by various agencies of the countries, states, provinces and other localities in which the Company sells its products.  

Medical Device Clearance and Approval  

To be commercially distributed in the U.S., a medical device must, unless exempt, receive clearance or approval from the FDA pursuant to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (“FDCA”). Lower risk devices are categorized as either class I or II devices. For class II devices, the manufacturer must generally submit a premarket notification requesting clearance for commercial distribution known as a “510(k)” clearance. The Company’s condoms, lubricants, contact lens solution, wound wash and home pregnancy test kits are regulated as class II devices. Some low risk devices, including SPINBRUSH and other battery powered toothbrushes, are in class I and are generally exempted from the 510(k) requirement. To obtain 510(k) clearance, a device must be determined to be substantially equivalent in intended use and in safety and effectiveness to a benchmark device, or “predicate” that is already legally in commercial distribution. Any modification to a 510(k) cleared device that could significantly affect its safety or effectiveness, or that would constitute a change in its intended use, generally requires a new 510(k) clearance. A manufacturer may determine that a new 510(k) clearance is not required, but if the FDA disagrees, it may retroactively require a 510(k) clearance and may require the manufacturer to cease marketing or recall the modified device until 510(k) clearance is obtained.  

Medical Device Postmarket Regulation

After a medical device is commercialized, numerous regulatory requirements apply, including:  

·

the quality system regulation, which imposes FDA current Good Manufacturing Practice (“cGMP”) requirements governing the methods used in, and the facilities and controls used for, the design, manufacture, packaging, servicing, labeling, storage, installation, and distribution of all finished medical devices intended for human use;

·

labeling regulations, including a prohibition on product promotion for unapproved or “off label” uses;

·

the medical device reporting regulation requiring a manufacturer to report to the FDA if its device may have caused or contributed to a death or serious injury or malfunctioned in a way that would likely cause or contribute to a death or serious injury if it were to recur; and

·

the reports of corrections and removals regulation, which requires a manufacturer to report recalls and field actions to the FDA if initiated to reduce a risk to health posed by the device or to remedy a violation of the FDCA that may present a risk to health.

OTC Pharmaceutical

The Company markets over-the-counter (“OTC”) pharmaceutical products, such as toothpaste, antiperspirant, and oral analgesics products, that are also subject to FDA and foreign regulation. Under the U.S. OTC monograph system, selected OTC pharmaceutical products are generally recognized as safe and effective and do not require the submission and approval of a new drug application. The FDA OTC monographs include well-known ingredients and specify requirements for permitted indications, required warnings and precautions, allowable combinations of ingredients and dosage levels. Pharmaceutical products marketed under the OTC monograph system must conform to specific quality, formula and labeling requirements.

All facilities where OTC pharmaceutical products are manufactured, tested, packaged, stored or distributed must comply with cGMP regulations and/or regulations promulgated by competent authorities in the countries where the facilities are located. All of the

12


 

Company’s pharmaceutical products are manufactured, tested, packaged, stored and distributed according to cGMP regulations. The FDA performs periodic audits to ensure that the Company’s facilities remain in compliance with all appropriate regulations. The failure of a facility to be in compliance may lead to a breach of representations made to customers or to regulatory action against the Company related to the products made in that facility, such as seizure, injunction or recall. Serious product quality concerns could also result in governmental actions against the Company that, among other things, could result in the suspension of production or distribution of the Company’s products, product seizures, loss of certain licenses or other governmental penalties, and could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial condition or operating results. The manufacturer, packer, or distributor of an OTC pharmaceutical product marketed in the U.S. whose name appears on the label of such product is required to report serious adverse events associated with the use of the product.  

The Company cannot predict whether new legislation regulating the Company’s activities will be enacted or what effect any legislation would have on the Company’s business.

Food Products

The Company markets baking soda and animal feed products, such as rumen fermentation enhancers and DCAD balancers, that are also subject to FDA and foreign regulation. In 2011, the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was enacted, changing the ways in which food and animal feed products are regulated. Under the provisions of the Act, the emphasis shifted from compliant products to mandatory preventive controls including hazard analysis, risk controls, supplier qualifications and controls and increased record keeping. FSMA grants the FDA the authority to require mandatory recalls for products under certain conditions. The FDA is currently in the process of establishing rules and guidance to implement the provisions of FSMA.  The potential impact of these rules and applicable guidance cannot be determined at this time.

Dietary Supplements

The processing, formulation, safety, manufacturing, packaging, labeling, advertising, distribution, importing, selling, and storing of dietary supplements are subject to regulation by one or more federal agencies, including the FDA, the FTC, the CPSC, the EPA, and by various agencies of the states and localities in which the Company’s products are sold. The FDCA governs the composition, safety, labeling, manufacturing and marketing of dietary supplements.  

Generally, dietary ingredients that were marketed in the U.S. prior to October 15, 1994 may be used in dietary supplements without notifying the FDA. “New” dietary ingredients (i.e. dietary ingredients that were not marketed in the U.S. before October 15, 1994) must be the subject of a new dietary ingredient notification submitted to the FDA at least 75 days before the initial marketing unless the ingredient has been present in the food supply as an article used for food without being chemically altered. A new dietary ingredient notification must provide evidence of a history of use or other evidence establishing that use of the dietary ingredient is reasonably expected to be safe. The FDA may determine that a new dietary ingredient notification does not provide an adequate basis to conclude that a dietary ingredient is reasonably expected to be safe. Such a determination could effectively prevent the marketing of the dietary ingredient. On July 5, 2011, the FDA issued draft guidance governing notification of new dietary ingredients. The draft guidance was issued for public comment and not for implementation. To date the FDA has not taken any further steps towards implementing the guidance. The guidance, if implemented, could effectively change the status of dietary ingredients that the industry has marketed as “old” dietary ingredients to “new” dietary ingredients that may require submission of a new dietary ingredient notification.  

The FDCA permits “statements of nutritional support” to be included in labeling for dietary supplements without FDA pre-market approval. The FDA must be notified of those statements within 30 days of marketing. Among other things, the statements may describe the role of a dietary ingredient intended to affect the structure or function of the body or characterize the documented mechanism of action by which a dietary ingredient maintains such structure or function, but may not expressly or implicitly represent that a dietary supplement will diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat, or prevent a disease. A company that uses a statement of nutritional support in labeling must possess information substantiating that the statement is truthful and not misleading. If the FDA determines that a particular statement of nutritional support is an unacceptable drug claim or an unauthorized version of a health claim, or if the FDA determines that a particular claim is not adequately supported by existing scientific evidence or is otherwise false or misleading, the claim could not be used and any product bearing the claim could be subject to regulatory action.

The FDA’s cGMP regulations govern the manufacturing, packaging, labeling and holding operations of dietary supplement manufacturers. As with OTC products, the FDA performs periodic audits to ensure that the Company’s dietary supplement facilities remain in compliance with all appropriate regulations. The failure of a facility to be in compliance may lead to a breach of representation made to customers or to regulatory action against the Company related to the products made in that facility, seizure, injunction or recall. There remains considerable uncertainty with respect to the FDA’s interpretation of the cGMP regulations and their actual implementation in manufacturing facilities. The failure of a manufacturing facility to comply with the cGMP regulations

13


 

may render products manufactured in that facility adulterated, and subjects those products and the manufacturer to a variety of potential FDA enforcement actions. In addition, under recent amendments to the FDCA, the manufacturing of dietary ingredients contained in dietary supplements will be subject to similar or even more burdensome requirements, which may increase the costs of dietary ingredients and subject suppliers of such ingredients to more rigorous inspections and enforcement. The manufacturer, packer, or distributor of a dietary supplement marketed in the U.S. whose name appears on the label of the supplement is required to report serious adverse events associated with the use of that supplement to the FDA.

The FTC exercises jurisdiction over the advertising of dietary supplements. The FTC considers whether a product’s advertising claims are accurate, truthful and not misleading pursuant to its authority under the Federal Trade Commission Act, or FTC Act. The FTC has instituted numerous enforcement actions against dietary supplement companies for failure to adequately substantiate claims made in advertising or for the use of otherwise false or misleading advertising claims. These enforcement actions have resulted in consent decrees and the payment of civil penalties and/or restitution by the companies involved. Such actions can result in substantial financial penalties and significantly restrict the marketing of a dietary supplement.

Legislation may be introduced which, if passed, would impose substantial new regulatory requirements on dietary supplements. The effect of additional domestic or international governmental legislation, regulations, or administrative orders, if and when promulgated, cannot be determined. New legislation or regulations may require the reformulation of certain products to meet new standards, and require the recall or discontinuance of certain products not capable of reformulation.  

ENVIRONMENTAL MATTERS

The Company’s operations are subject to federal, state, local and foreign laws, rules and regulations relating to environmental and health and safety concerns including air emissions, wastewater discharges, and solid and hazardous waste management activities. The Company endeavors to take actions necessary to comply with such regulations. These steps include periodic environmental audits of Company facilities. The audits, conducted by independent engineering firms with expertise in environmental compliance, include site visits at each location, as well as a review of documentary information, to determine compliance with such federal, state, local and foreign laws, rules and regulations.    

See Item 3, “Legal Proceedings” in this Annual Report for information regarding an environmental proceeding relating to the Company’s Brazilian subsidiary.

GEOGRAPHIC AREAS

Approximately 81%, 80% and 79% of the Company’s net sales in 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively, were to customers in the U.S.  Approximately 96%, 97% and 97% of the Company’s long-lived assets were located in the U.S. at December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.  Other than the U.S., no one country accounts for more than 7% of consolidated net sales and 5% of total assets.  

EMPLOYEES

At December 31, 2014, the Company had approximately 4,200 employees.  The Company is party to a labor contract with the International Machinists Union at its Colonial Heights, Virginia plant, which expires May 31, 2018.  Internationally, the Company employs union employees in France, Mexico, Brazil and New Zealand.  The Company believes that its relations with both its union and non-union employees are satisfactory.

 

CLASSES OF SIMILAR PRODUCTS

The Company’s operations, exclusive of unconsolidated entities, constitute three reportable segments: Consumer Domestic, Consumer International and SPD.  The table set forth below shows the percentage of the Company’s net sales (exclusive of net sales of unconsolidated entities) contributed by each group of similar products marketed by the Company during 2014, 2013 and 2012.

14


 

 

 

 

% of Net Sales

 

 

 

2014

 

 

2013

 

 

2012

 

Consumer Domestic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Household Products

 

 

45%

 

 

 

45%

 

 

 

48%

 

Personal Care Products

 

 

30%

 

 

 

30%

 

 

 

26%

 

Consumer International

 

 

16%

 

 

 

17%

 

 

 

17%

 

Specialty Products

 

 

9%

 

 

 

8%

 

 

 

9%

 

 

PUBLIC INFORMATION

The Company maintains a website at www.churchdwight.com and on the “Investors—SEC Filings” page of the website makes available free of charge the Company’s annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as soon as reasonably practicable after the Company electronically files these materials with, or furnishes them to, the Commission. Also available on the “Investors—Corporate Governance” page on the Company’s website are the Company’s Corporate Governance Guidelines, charters for the Audit, Compensation & Organization and Governance & Nominating Committees of the Board and the Company’s Code of Conduct. Each of the foregoing is also available in print free of charge and may be obtained upon written request to: Church & Dwight Co., Inc., 500 Charles Ewing Boulevard, Ewing, New Jersey 08628, attention: Secretary. The information presented in the Company’s website is not a part of this Annual Report and the reference to the Company’s website is intended to be an inactive textual reference only.

 

 


15


 

ITEM 1A.

RISK FACTORS

The following risks and uncertainties, as well as others described elsewhere in this Annual Report, could materially adversely affect the Company’s business, results of operations and financial condition:

·

Unfavorable economic conditions could adversely affect demand for the Company’s products.  

Unfavorable and uncertain economic conditions have adversely affected, and in the future may adversely affect, demand for some of the categories of products the Company sells, resulting in reduced sales volume or market share or a shift in its product mix from higher margin to lower margin products. Factors that can affect demand include competitors’ products, advertising and pricing actions, rates of unemployment, consumer confidence, health care costs, fuel and other energy costs and other economic factors affecting consumer spending behavior, including delays in the timing of tax refunds from the federal government, gasoline and home heating oil pricing, reduced unemployment benefits in periods of high unemployment and tax increases. While the vast majority of the Company’s products generally are consumer staples that should be less vulnerable to decreases in discretionary spending than other products, they may become subject to increasing price competition. Moreover, some of the Company’s products, such as laundry additives, gummy dietary supplements and battery-operated toothbrushes, are more likely to be affected by consumer decisions to control spending.

Some of the Company’s customers, including mass merchandisers, supermarkets, drugstores, convenience stores, wholesale clubs, home stores, and dollar, pet and other specialty stores, have experienced and may experience in the future declining financial performance, which could affect their ability to pay amounts due to the Company on a timely basis or at all. The Company regularly reviews the financial strength of its key customers and, where appropriate, modifies customer credit limits, which may have an adverse impact on future sales. Because the same economic conditions that affect the Company also affect many of the Company’s suppliers, the Company regularly conducts a similar review of its suppliers to assess both their financial viability and the importance of their products to the Company’s operations. When appropriate, the Company identifies alternate sources of materials and services. To date, the Company has not experienced a material adverse impact from economic conditions affecting its customers or suppliers. However, a protracted economic downturn that adversely affects the Company’s suppliers and customers could adversely affect its sales and results of operations.  

·

The Company faces intense competition in its markets, and the failure to compete effectively could have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations.

The Company faces intense competition from consumer products companies, both in the U.S. and in international markets. Most of the Company’s products compete with other widely-advertised brands within each product category and with private label brands and generic non-branded products of its customers in certain categories, which typically are sold at lower prices.

The Company’s products generally compete on the basis of performance, brand recognition, price, value or other benefits to consumers. Consumer products are subject to significant price competition. As a result, the Company may need to reduce the prices for some of its products, or increase prices by an amount that does not cover manufacturing cost increases, to respond to competitive and customer pressures and to maintain market share. Any reduction in prices, or inability to raise prices sufficiently to cover manufacturing cost increases, would harm profit margins. In addition, if the Company’s sales volumes fail to grow sufficiently to offset any reduction in margins, its sales growth and other results of operations would suffer.

Advertising, promotion, merchandising and packaging also have a significant impact on retail customer decisions regarding the brands and product lines they sell and on consumer purchasing decisions. A newly introduced consumer product (whether improved or newly developed) usually encounters intense competition requiring substantial expenditures for advertising, sales promotion and trade merchandising. If a product gains consumer acceptance, it normally requires continued advertising, promotional support and product improvements to maintain its relative market position. If the Company’s advertising, marketing and promotional programs are not effective, its sales growth may decline.  

Many of the Company’s competitors are large companies, including P&G, The Sun Products Corporation, The Clorox Company, Colgate-Palmolive Company, Henkel AG & Co. KGaA, Reckitt Benckiser Group plc, Johnson & Johnson, Nestle Purina PetCare Company, Ansell Limited, Alere Inc., Pfizer Inc., Bayer AG, S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc., Pharmavite LLC and NBTY, Inc. Many of these companies have greater financial resources than does the Company, and, therefore, have the capacity to outspend the Company on advertising and promotional activities and introduce competing products more quickly and respond more effectively to changing business and economic conditions than can the Company. In addition, the Company’s competitors may attempt to gain market share by offering products at prices at or below those typically offered by it. Competitive activity may require the Company to increase its spending on advertising and promotions and/or reduce prices, which could lead to reduced profits and adversely affect growth. If the Company loses market share or the markets in which it competes do not grow substantially, its sales growth will decline.  

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Since the 2012 introduction in the U.S. of unit dose laundry detergent by various manufacturers, including the Company, there has been significant product and price competition in the laundry detergent category, contributing to an overall category decline. During 2012, 2013 and 2014, the category declined 0.6%, an additional 3.2% and an additional 2.9%, respectively. In 2014, P&G, the market leader in premium laundry detergent, including unit dose laundry detergent, reconfigured certain of its product offerings and related marketing and pricing strategies and launched various products to compete more directly with the Company’s core ARM & HAMMER, XTRA and OXICLEAN power brands. Specifically, P&G launched lower-priced laundry detergents to compete directly with the Company’s core value laundry detergents and has launched a versatile stain remover to compete with the Company’s pre-wash additive, OXICLEAN, supported by aggressive trade spending and marketing.  These actions and price competition could negatively impact the Company’s laundry detergent and versatile stain remover businesses.    

·

Loss of any of its principal customers could significantly decrease the Company’s sales and profitability.  

A limited number of customers account for a large percentage of the Company’s net sales.  Wal-Mart is the Company’s largest customer, accounting for approximately 25% of net sales in 2014, 24% of net sales in 2013 and 24% of net sales in 2012.  The Company’s top three customers accounted for approximately 36% of net sales in 2014, 35% of net sales in 2013 and 34% of net sales in 2012.  The Company expects that a significant portion of its net sales will continue to be derived from a small number of customers and that these percentages may increase if the growth of mass merchandisers continues. As a result, changes in the strategies of Wal-Mart or any of the Company’s other largest customers, including a reduction in the number of brands they carry or of shelf space they dedicate to private label products, could materially harm the Company’s net sales and profitability.  

In addition, the Company’s business is based primarily upon individual sales orders as it rarely enters into long-term contracts with its customers and most customer agreements include customer termination rights after short notice. Accordingly, these customers could reduce their purchasing levels or cease buying products from the Company at any time and for any reason. If the Company loses a significant customer or if sales of its products to a significant customer materially decrease, it could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations.  

·

Changes in the policies of the Company’s retailer customers and increasing dependence on key retailer customers in developed markets may adversely affect its business.  

In recent years, the Company has seen increasing retailer consolidation both in the U.S. and internationally. This trend has resulted in the increased size and influence of large consolidated retailer customers, who may demand lower pricing, special packaging or impose other requirements on the Company. These business demands may relate to inventory practices, logistics or other aspects of the customer-supplier relationship. Some of the Company’s customers, particularly its high-volume retail store customers, have sought to obtain pricing concessions or better trade terms. To the extent the Company provides concessions or better trade terms to those customers, its margins are reduced. Further, if the Company is unable to effectively respond to the demands of its customers, these customers could reduce their purchases of Company products and increase their purchases of products from competitors, which would harm the Company’s sales and profitability. In addition, reductions in inventory by the Company’s customers, including as a result of consolidations in the retail industry, or these customers managing their working capital requirements, could result in reduced orders for Company products and adversely affect its results of operations for the financial periods affected by the reductions.  

Protracted unfavorable market conditions have caused many of the Company’s customers to more critically analyze the number of brands they sell, and reduce or discontinue certain of the Company’s product lines, particularly those products that were not number one or two in their category. If this continues to occur and the Company is unable to improve distribution for those products at other customers, its results could be adversely affected.  

In addition, private label products sold by retail trade chains are typically sold at lower prices than branded products. As consumers look for opportunities to decrease discretionary spending, the Company’s customers have discontinued or reduced distribution of some of its products to encourage those consumers to purchase the customers’ less expensive private label products (primarily in the dietary supplements, diagnostic kits and oral analgesics categories). To the extent customers discontinue or reduce distribution of the Company’s products or these products are adversely affected by customers’ actions to increase shelf space for their private label products, the Company would seek to improve distribution with other customers. However, if the Company’s efforts are not effective, its sales growth and other results, as well as its market share, could be adversely affected.

·

A continued shift in the retail market from food and drug stores to club stores, dollar stores and mass merchandisers could cause the Company’s sales to decline.  

The Company’s performance depends upon the general health of the economy and of the retail environment in particular, and could be significantly harmed by changes affecting retailing and the financial difficulties of the Company’s retailer customers. Consumer products, such as those marketed by the Company, are increasingly being sold by club stores, dollar stores and mass

17


 

merchandisers. Sales of the Company’s products remain strongest in the mass merchandiser, food and drug channels of trade, and the Company’s products are also being sold in the club stores and dollar stores channels. Although the Company has taken steps to improve, and has seen improvement in, sales to club stores and dollar stores, if the current trend continues and the Company is not successful in further improving sales to these channels, its financial condition and operating results could suffer.  

·

Market category declines and changes to the Company’s product and geographic mix may impact the achievement of the Company’s sales growth targets, planned pricing and financial results.

A significant percentage of the Company’s revenues comes from mature markets that are subject to high levels of competition.  During 2014, approximately 80% of the Company’s sales were generated in U.S. markets.  U.S. markets for consumer products are considered mature and commonly characterized by high household penetration, particularly with respect to the Company’s most significant product categories, such as laundry detergents, deodorizers, household cleaning products, toothpastes, dietary supplements, antiperspirants and deodorants. The Company’s ability to achieve unit sales growth in domestic markets will depend on increased use of its products by consumers relative to competitors’ products, its ability to drive growth through product innovation in existing and new product categories, investment in its established brands and enhanced merchandising and its ability to capture market share from its competitors. If the Company is unable to increase market share in existing product lines, develop product improvements, undertake sales, marketing and advertising initiatives that expand its product categories and develop, acquire or successfully launch new products, it may not achieve its sales growth objectives. Even if the Company is successful in increasing sales within its product categories, a continuing or accelerating decline in the overall markets for the Company’s products could have a negative impact on its financial results.

·

Cost overruns and delays, regulatory requirements, and miscalculations in capacity needs with respect to the Company’s expansion projects could adversely affect its business.

The Company initiates expansion projects from time to time. For example, the Company is currently expanding its gummy dietary supplements production capacity at its York, Pennsylvania manufacturing facility to meet expected future product demand. The new gummy dietary supplements line is expected to start production in the first quarter of 2015. Projects of this type are subject to risks of delay or cost overruns inherent in any large construction project resulting from numerous factors, including the following: shortages of equipment, materials or skilled labor; work stoppages; unscheduled delays in the delivery of ordered materials and equipment; unanticipated cost increases; difficulties in obtaining necessary permits or in meeting permit conditions; difficulties in meeting regulatory requirements or obtaining regulatory approvals; availability of suppliers to certify equipment for existing and enhanced regulations; design and engineering problems; and failure or delay of third party service providers, civil unrest and labor disputes. Significant cost overruns or delays in completing a project could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s return on investment, results of operations and cash flows. In addition, if the Company miscalculates its anticipated capacity needs, this too could negatively impact its operations, financial condition and results of operations.  

·

The Company’s reliance on a limited number of suppliers, including sole source suppliers for certain products, could materially and adversely affect its operations and financial results.  

The Company relies on a limited number of suppliers for certain of its commodities and raw materials, including sole source suppliers for certain of its raw materials, packaging, product components, finished products and other necessary supplies. New suppliers may have to be qualified under governmental, industry and Company standards, which can require additional investment and time. The Company may be unable to qualify any needed new suppliers or maintain supplier arrangements and relationships; it may be unable to contract with suppliers at the quantity, quality and price levels needed for its business; or certain of the Company’s key suppliers may become insolvent or experience other financial distress. If any of these events occurs and the Company has failed to identify and qualify an alternative vendor, then it may be unable to meet its contractual obligations and customer expectations, which could damage its reputation and result in lost customers and sales, or the Company may incur higher than expected expenses, either of which could materially and adversely affect its business, operations and results of operations.

·

Volatility and increases in the price of raw and packaging materials or energy costs could erode the Company’s profit margins, which could harm operating results, and efforts to hedge against raw material price increases may adversely affect the Company’s operating results if raw material prices decline.

The principal raw materials and packaging used by the Company include surfactants (cleaning agents), paper products and resin-based molded components. Volatility and increases in the price of raw materials, or increases in the costs of energy, shipping and other necessary services, could significantly affect the Company’s profit margins if it is unable to pass along any higher costs in the form of price increases or otherwise achieve cost efficiencies, such as in manufacturing and distribution. Historically, the Company has attempted to address such price increases through cost reduction programs and price increases of its products, entering into pre-buying or locked-in pricing arrangements with certain suppliers and entering into hedge agreements. There is no assurance, however, that the Company will be able to fully offset any price increases, especially given the competitive environment. In addition, volatility

18


 

in certain commodity markets could significantly affect the Company’s production cost and, therefore, harm its financial condition and operating results.  

The Company uses hedge agreements to mitigate the volatility of diesel fuel prices. The hedge agreements are designed to add stability to product costs, enabling the Company to make pricing decisions and lessen the economic impact of abrupt changes in prices over the term of the contract. However, in periods of declining fuel prices, the hedge agreements can have the effect of locking the Company in at above-market prices.

·

If new products and product line extensions do not gain widespread customer acceptance or are otherwise discontinued, or if they cause sales of existing products to decline, the Company’s financial performance could decline.  

The Company’s future performance and growth depends on its ability to successfully develop and introduce new products and product line extensions. The Company cannot be certain that it will achieve its innovation goals. The successful development and introduction of new products involves substantial research, development, marketing and promotional expenditures, which the Company may be unable to recover if the new products do not gain widespread market acceptance. New product development and marketing efforts, including efforts to enter markets or product categories in which the Company has limited or no prior experience, have inherent risks. These risks include product development or launch delays, competitor actions, regulatory approval hurdles and the failure of new products and line extensions to achieve anticipated levels of market acceptance. In addition, if sales generated by new products result in a concomitant decline in sales of existing products, the Company’s financial performance could be harmed.  

For example, the Company has been launching more new products into “white space” categories than it has historically. In 2014, the Company expanded the OXICLEAN brand into three additional categories: premium laundry detergent, dishwashing detergent and bleach alternatives. In addition, the Company launched new products across almost all of its core businesses including a premium clumping cat litter called ARM & HAMMER CLUMP & SEAL, a new premium toothpaste called ARM & HAMMER TRULY RADIANT, a new vitamin line for the VITAFUSION brand, and new condoms, vibrators and lubricants under the TROJAN brand. While most of these new products have received strong distribution acceptance from the Company’s retailers to date, and will be supported by increased marketing spending, there is no assurance that the Company’s customers and consumers will continue to purchase these new products. If these new products are not successful in gaining market share, the Company’s financial results could suffer.

From time to time, the Company has discontinued certain products and product lines, which resulted in returns from customers, asset write-offs and shutdown costs. The Company may suffer similar adverse consequences in the future to the extent it discontinues products that do not meet expectations or no longer satisfy consumer demand.  

·

Reduced availability of transportation or disruptions in our transportation network could adversely affect us.

We distribute our products and receive raw materials and packaging components primarily by truck, rail and ship and through various ports of entry.  Reduced availability of trucking, rail or shipping capacity due to adverse weather conditions, allocation of assets to other industries or geographies or otherwise, work stoppages, strikes or shutdowns of ports of entry or such transportation sources, could cause us to incur unanticipated expenses and impair our ability to distribute our products or receive our raw materials or packaging components in a timely manner, which could disrupt our operations, strain our customer relationships and competitive position, and adversely affect our operating profits.

·

If the reputation of one or more of the Company’s leading brands erodes, its financial results could suffer.  

The Company’s financial success is directly dependent on the reputation and success of its brands, particularly the ARM & HAMMER, OXICLEAN, TROJAN, L’IL CRITTERS and VITAFUSION brands. The effectiveness of these brands could suffer if the Company’s marketing plans or product initiatives do not have the desired impact on a brand’s image or its ability to attract consumers. Further, the Company’s results could be adversely affected if one or more of its other leading brands suffers damage to its reputation due to real or perceived quality or safety issues.

Additionally, claims made in the Company’s marketing campaigns may become subject to litigation alleging false advertising, which, if successful, could cause the Company to alter its marketing plans and may materially and adversely affect sales or result in the imposition of significant damages against the Company, or other customer or consumer dissatisfaction, especially if such dissatisfaction were to be broadly disseminated, including through the use of social media.  

 

Widespread use of social media and networking sites by consumers has greatly increased the speed and accessibility of information dissemination.  Negative or inaccurate posting or comments about the Company in the media or on any social networking website, or the disclosure of non-public sensitive information through social media, could generate adverse publicity that

19


 

could damage the reputation of our brands.  In addition, given the association of our individual products with the Company, an issue with one of our products could negatively affect the reputation of our other products, or the Company as a whole, thereby potentially adversely impacting the Company’s financial results.  

·

Product liability claims and withdrawals or recalls could adversely affect the Company’s sales and operating results and brand’s reputation.  

From time to time, the Company is subject to product liability claims. The Company may be required to pay for losses or injuries actually or purportedly caused by its products, including losses or injuries caused by raw materials or other components provided by third party suppliers that are included in the Company’s products. Claims could be based on allegations that, among other things, the Company’s products contain contaminants, are improperly labeled, or provide inadequate instructions regarding their use or inadequate warnings concerning interactions with other substances. Whether or not successful, product liability claims could result in negative publicity that could harm the Company’s sales and operating results and the reputation of its brands. In addition, if one of the Company’s products is found to be defective or non-compliant with applicable rules or regulations, it could be required to withdraw or recall it, which could result in adverse publicity and significant expenses. Although the Company maintains product liability and product recall insurance coverage (that also covers product withdrawals), potential product liability claims and withdrawal and recall costs may exceed the amount of insurance coverage or may be excluded under the terms of the policy, which could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, operating results and financial condition.

·

Environmental matters create potential liability risks.  

The Company must comply with various environmental laws and regulations in the jurisdictions in which it operates, including those relating to the handling and disposal of solid and hazardous wastes and the remediation of contamination associated with the use and disposal of hazardous substances. A release of such substances due to accident or an intentional act could result in substantial liability to governmental authorities or to third parties. The Company has incurred, and will continue to incur, capital and operating expenditures and other costs in complying with environmental laws and regulations. The Company currently is subject to environmental regulatory proceedings involving its Brazilian subsidiary, which has been fined the equivalent of approximately $1.9 million (at current exchange rates) in the proceedings.  The Brazilian subsidiary is contesting the fine. In addition, the Company may be required to remove certain landfills in Brazil in connection with these proceedings, the cost of which is estimated to be in the range of $30 million to $50 million. It is possible that the Company could become subject to additional environmental liabilities in the future, particularly with respect to its operations in Brazil, that could have a material adverse effect on its results of operations or financial condition.  

·

Current and future laws and regulations in the countries in which the company and its suppliers operate could expose the Company to increased costs and other adverse consequences.  

The manufacturing, processing, formulation (including stability), packaging, labeling, marketing, distribution and sale of the Company’s products are subject to regulation by federal agencies, including the FDA, the FTC, the EPA and the CPSC. In addition, the Company’s and its suppliers’ operations are subject to the oversight of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the National Labor Relations Board. The Company’s activities are also regulated by various agencies of the states, localities and foreign countries in which its products are sold.  

In particular, the FDA regulates the formulation, safety, manufacturing, packaging, labeling and distribution of condoms, home pregnancy and ovulation test kits, battery operated toothbrushes, over-the-counter pharmaceuticals and dietary supplements, including vitamins and minerals. The FDA also exercises oversight over cosmetic products such as depilatories. In addition, under a memorandum of understanding between the FDA and the FTC, the FTC has jurisdiction with regard to the promotion and advertising of these products, and the FTC regulates the promotion and advertising of the Company’s other products as well. As part of its regulatory authority, the FDA may periodically conduct inspections of the physical facilities, machinery, processes and procedures that the Company and its suppliers use to manufacture regulated products and may identify compliance issues that would require the Company and its suppliers to make certain changes in its manufacturing facilities and processes. The failure of a facility to be in compliance may lead to regulatory action against the products made in that facility, including seizure, injunction or recall, as well as to possible action against the owner of the facility/manufacturer. The Company may be required to make additional expenditures to address these issues or possibly stop selling certain products until the compliance issue has been remediated. As a result, the Company’s business could be adversely affected.

Likewise, any future determination by the FDA or a similar foreign agency, or by the Company in reviewing its compliance with applicable rules and regulations, that the Company’s products or quality systems do not comply with applicable regulations could result in future compliance activities, including product withdrawals or recalls, import detentions, injunctions preventing the shipment of products, or other enforcement actions. For example, the FDA may determine that a particular claim that the Company uses to support the marketing of a product is not substantiated, may not accept the evidence of safety for a new product that the Company may

20


 

wish to market, may challenge the safety or effectiveness of existing products based on, among other things, changes in formulations, inadequate stability or “shelf-life,” consumer complaints, or improper labeling, and may determine that the Company’s dietary supplement business manufacturing, packaging, labeling and holding operations do not comply with cGMPs. Similarly, the Company may identify these or other issues in internal compliance reviews of its operations and the operations and products of vendors and acquired companies. These other issues may include the identification of contaminants or non-compliant levels of particular ingredients. Any of the foregoing could subject the Company to adverse publicity, force it to incur unanticipated costs and have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, the Commission has promulgated final rules mandated by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act regarding disclosure of the use of tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold, known as “conflict minerals”, in products manufactured by public companies. Certain of the Company’s products, including its diagnostic test kits and SPINBRUSH battery-operated toothbrushes, use these minerals sourced through third parties. The new rules require the Company to conduct due diligence to determine whether such minerals originated from the Democratic Republic of Congo (the DRC) or an adjoining country and whether such minerals helped finance the armed conflict in the DRC.  The Company has incurred, and will continue to incur, costs associated with complying with these disclosure requirements, including costs to determine the origin of minerals used in its products. In addition, the implementation of these rules could adversely affect the sourcing, supply and pricing of such minerals used in the Company’s products. Also, the Company may face disqualification as a supplier for customers and reputational challenges, or may need to discontinue supply from its suppliers, if its due diligence procedures do not enable it to verify the origins for the minerals used in its products or determine that the minerals are conflict free.

From time to time, Congress, the FDA, the FTC, the Commission or other federal, state, local or foreign legislative and regulatory authorities may impose additional laws or regulations that apply to the Company, repeal laws or regulations that the Company considers favorable, or impose more stringent interpretations of current laws or regulations. The Company is not able to predict the nature of such future laws, regulations, repeals or interpretations or to predict the effect additional governmental regulation, when and if it occurs, would have on its business in the future. Such developments could require reformulation of certain products to meet new standards, recalls or discontinuance of certain products not able to be reformulated, additional record-keeping requirements, increased documentation of the properties of certain products, additional or different labeling, additional scientific substantiation, expanded adverse event reporting or other new requirements. Any such developments could increase the Company’s costs significantly and could have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations.  

·

The Company is subject to risks related to its international operations that could adversely affect its results of operations.  

The Company’s international operations subject it to risks customarily associated with foreign operations, including:

·

currency fluctuations;

·

import and export license and taxation requirements and restrictions;

·

trade restrictions, including local investment or exchange control regulations;

·

changes in tariffs and taxes, the effect of foreign income taxes, value-added taxes and withholding taxes, including the inability to recover amounts owed to the Company by foreign governments, and the determination of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (the “I.R.S.”) regarding the applicability of certain regulations, including the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act, to the Company’s international transactions;

·

the possibility of expropriation, confiscatory taxation or price controls;

·

obstacles to repatriating foreign profits back to the U.S.;

·

political or economic instability, and civil unrest;

·

disruptions in the global transportation network, such as work stoppages, strikes or shutdowns of ports of entry or such other transportation sources, or other labor unrest;

·

compliance with laws and regulations concerning ethical business practices, including without limitation, the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and United Kingdom Bribery Act;

·

difficulty in enforcing contractual and intellectual property rights;

·

regulatory requirements for certain products; and

·

difficulties in staffing and managing international operations.  

These risks could have a significant impact on the Company’s ability to commercialize its products on a competitive basis in international markets and may have a material adverse effect on its results of operations or financial position.  In all foreign

21


 

jurisdictions in which the Company operates, it is subject to laws and regulations that govern foreign investment, foreign trade and currency exchange transactions.  

In addition, the Company is exposed to foreign currency exchange rate risk with respect to its sales, profits, assets and liabilities denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. Outside of the U.S., sales and costs are denominated in a variety of currencies, including the Canadian Dollar, Euro, British Pound, Brazilian Real, Mexican Peso, Chinese Yuan and Australian Dollar. A weakening of the currencies in which sales are generated relative to the currencies in which costs are denominated would decrease operating profits and cash flow. The Company, from time to time, enters into forward exchange contracts to reduce the impact of foreign exchange rate fluctuations related to anticipated but not yet committed intercompany sales or purchases denominated in the U.S. Dollar, Canadian Dollar, British Pound and Euro.  

·

The Company may not be able to continue to identify and complete strategic acquisitions and effectively integrate acquired companies to achieve desired financial benefits.  

The Company seeks to acquire or invest in businesses that offer products, services or technologies that are complementary. The Company has made nine acquisitions in the past twelve years, including the following brands: SPINBRUSH battery-powered toothbrushes; OXICLEAN, KABOOM and ORANGE GLO cleaning products; ORAJEL oral analgesics; SIMPLY SALINE nasal moisturizers; FELINE PINE natural cat litter; BATISTE dry shampoo; L’IL CRITTERS and VITAFUSION dietary supplements; REPHRESH and REPLENS feminine care products; and, in January 2015, VI-COR, a manufacturer and seller of feed ingredients for dairy cows, beef cattle, poultry and other livestock.  

The Company may make additional acquisitions or substantial investments in complementary businesses or products in the future. However, the Company may not be able to identify and successfully negotiate suitable strategic acquisitions at attractive valuations, obtain financing for future acquisitions on satisfactory terms or otherwise complete future acquisitions. In addition, all acquisitions and investments entail various risks, including the difficulty of entering new markets or product categories, the challenges of integrating the operations and personnel of the acquired businesses or products, the potential disruption of the Company’s ongoing business and the ongoing business of the acquired company, the need to review and, if necessary, upgrade processes of the acquired company to conform to the Company’s own processes and applicable legal and regulatory requirements, and, generally, the Company’s potential inability to obtain the desired financial and strategic benefits from the acquisition or investment. Any of these risks may divert management and other resources, require the Company to incur unanticipated costs or delay the anticipated positive impact on the Company’s business and results of the acquisition. The risks associated with assimilation are increased to the extent the Company acquires businesses that have stand-alone operations that cannot easily be integrated or operations or sources of supply outside of the U.S. and Canada, for which products are manufactured locally by third parties. These factors could harm the Company’s financial condition and operating results.  

Acquired companies or operations or newly-created ventures may not be profitable or may not achieve sales levels and profitability that justify the investments made. In addition, future acquisitions or investments could result in substantial cash expenditures, the potentially dilutive issuances of new equity by the Company or the incurrence of additional debt or contingent liabilities, all of which could adversely affect the Company’s results of operations and financial condition. In addition, any potential acquisitions or investments, whether or not ultimately completed, could divert the attention of management and resources from other matters that are critical to the Company’s operations.  

·

The Company relies significantly on information technology.  Any inadequacy, interruption, theft or loss of data, malicious attack, integration failure, failure to maintain the security, confidentiality or privacy of sensitive data residing on our systems or other security failure of that technology could harm the Company’s ability to effectively operate its business and damage the reputation of its brands.  

The Company relies extensively on information technology systems, some of which are managed by third-party service providers, to conduct its business. These systems include, but are not limited to, programs and processes relating to internal communications and communications with other parties, ordering and managing materials from suppliers, converting materials to finished products, shipping product to customers, billing customers and receiving and applying payment, processing transactions, summarizing and reporting results of operations, complying with regulatory, legal or tax requirements, collecting and storing customer, consumer, employee, investor, and other stakeholder information and personal data, and other processes necessary to manage the Company’s business.  In addition, the Company is engaged in limited e-commerce with respect to its TROJAN brand.

Increased information technology security threats and more sophisticated computer crime, including advanced persistent threats, pose a potential risk to the security of the information technology systems, networks, and services of the Company, its customers and other business partners, as well as the confidentiality, availability, and integrity of the data of the Company, its customers and other business partners. As a result, the Company’s information technology systems, networks or service providers could be damaged or cease to function properly or the Company could suffer a loss or disclosure of business, personal or stakeholder information, due to

22


 

any number of causes, including catastrophic events, power outages and security breaches. Although the Company has business continuity plans in place and is in process of implementing a breach response plan to address service interruptions, if these plans do not provide effective alternative processes on a timely basis, the Company may suffer interruptions in its ability to manage or conduct its operations which may adversely affect its business.  The Company may need to expend additional resources in the future to continue to protect against, or to address problems caused by any business interruptions or data security breaches.  

Any business interruptions or data security breaches, including cyber security breaches resulting in private data disclosure, could result in lawsuits or regulatory proceedings, damage the Company’s reputation or adversely impact the Company’s results of operations and cash flows.

·

The Company’s substantial indebtedness could adversely affect its operations and financial results and prevent it from fulfilling its obligations, and the Company may incur substantially more debt in the future, which could exacerbate these risks.  

As of December 31, 2014, the Company had approximately $1,095 million of total consolidated indebtedness.  This amount of indebtedness could have important consequences, including:

·

making it more difficult for the Company to satisfy its cash obligations;

·

limiting the Company’s ability to fund potential acquisitions;

·

requiring the Company to dedicate a portion of its cash flow from operations to payments on its indebtedness, which would reduce the availability of cash flow to fund working capital requirements, capital expenditures and other general corporate purposes;

·

limiting the Company’s flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, general adverse economic conditions or changes in its business and the industry in which it operates; and

·

placing the Company at a competitive disadvantage compared to its competitors that have less debt.

In addition, the Company may incur substantial additional indebtedness in the future to fund acquisitions, to repurchase shares or to fund other activities for general business purposes. If new debt is added to the current debt levels, the related risks that the Company now faces could intensify. Any decision regarding future borrowings will be based on the facts and circumstances existing at the time, including market conditions and the Company’s credit rating.  

·

The Company may not have sufficient cash flow to service its indebtedness or fund capital expenditures.  

The Company’s ability to repay and refinance its indebtedness and to fund capital expenditures depends primarily on its cash flow. Cash flow is often subject to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative, regulatory and other factors beyond the Company’s control, and such factors may limit its ability to repay indebtedness and fund capital expenditures. A failure to service its indebtedness or obtain additional financing as needed could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, operating results and financial condition.

·

There can be no guarantee that the Company will continue to make dividend payments or repurchase the Common Stock at sustained levels or at all.

Although the Board has recently authorized new share repurchase programs and recently increased the amount of the quarterly cash dividends payable on the Common Stock, any Board determinations to continue to repurchase the Common Stock or to continue to pay cash dividends on the Common Stock, in each case at levels consistent with recent practice or at all, will be based primarily upon the Company’s financial condition, results of operations, business requirements, price of the Common Stock in the case of the repurchase programs, and the Board’s continuing determination that the repurchase programs and the declaration of dividends under the dividend policy are in the best interests of Company stockholders and are in compliance with all laws and agreements applicable to the repurchase and dividend programs. In the event the Company does not declare a quarterly dividend, or discontinues its share repurchases, its stock price could be adversely affected.

23


 

·

Recent volatility in the financial markets may negatively impact the Company’s ability to access the credit markets.

In recent years, the banking system and financial markets have experienced severe disruption, including, among other things, bank failures and consolidations, severely diminished liquidity and credit availability, rating downgrades, declines in asset valuations and fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates.  These conditions present the following risks to the Company, among others:

·

The Company is dependent on the continued viability of the financial institutions that participate in the syndicate that is generally obligated to fund the Company’s $600 million unsecured revolving credit facility dated December 19, 2014 (as amended, the “Credit Agreement”). In addition, the Credit Agreement includes a “commitment increase” feature that enables the Company to increase the amount of its borrowing under the Credit Agreement, subject to lending commitments and certain conditions. Any disruption in the credit markets could limit the availability of credit or the ability or willingness of financial institutions to extend credit, which could adversely affect the Company’s liquidity and capital resources.  

·

The Company’s short- and long-term credit ratings affect its borrowing costs and access to financing. A downgrade in the Company’s credit ratings would increase its borrowing costs and could affect its ability to issue commercial paper. Disruptions in the commercial paper market or other effects of volatile economic conditions on the credit market also could raise the Company’s borrowing costs for both short- and long-term debt offerings. Either scenario could adversely affect the Company’s liquidity and capital resources.  

Although the Company believes that its operating cash flows, together with its access to the credit markets, provides it with significant discretionary funding capacity, the inability of one or more institutions to fulfill funding obligations under the Credit Agreement could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s liquidity and operations.  

·

Changes in tax laws and regulations or in the Company’s operations may impact the Company’s effective tax rate and may adversely affect its earnings and cash flow.  

The Company’s future effective tax rate could be affected by changes in tax laws and regulations or their interpretation, changes in the mix of earnings in countries with differing statutory tax rates, or changes in the valuation of deferred tax assets and liabilities. The realization of deferred income tax assets is assessed and a valuation allowance is recorded if it is “more likely than not” that all or a portion of the deferred tax asset will not be realized. If the actual amount of the Company’s future taxable income is less than the amount it is currently projecting with respect to specific tax jurisdictions, or if there is a change in the time period within which the deferred tax asset becomes deductible, the Company could be required to record a valuation allowance against its deferred tax assets. The recording of a valuation allowance would result in an increase in the Company’s effective tax rate, and would have an adverse effect on its operating results. In addition, changes in statutory tax rates may change the Company’s deferred tax assets or liability balances, which would have either a favorable or unfavorable impact on its effective tax rate.

·

Resolutions of tax disputes may adversely affect the Company’s earnings and cash flow.  

Significant judgment is required in determining the Company’s effective tax rate and in evaluating its tax positions. The Company provides for uncertain tax positions with respect to tax positions that do not meet the recognition thresholds or measurement standards mandated by applicable accounting guidance. Fluctuations in federal, state, local and foreign taxes or changes to uncertain tax positions, including related interest and penalties, may impact the Company’s effective tax rate and its financial results. The Company is regularly under audit by tax authorities, and although the Company believes its tax estimates are reasonable, the final outcome of tax audits and related litigation could be materially different than that reflected in its historical income tax provisions and accruals. In addition, when particular tax matters arise, a number of years may elapse before such matters are audited and finally resolved. Favorable resolution of such matters could be recognized as a reduction to the Company’s effective tax rate in the year of resolution. Unfavorable resolution of any tax matter could increase the effective tax rate. Any resolution of a tax issue may require the use of cash in the year of resolution.  

·

Failure to effectively utilize or successfully assert intellectual property rights, and the loss or expiration of such rights, could materially adversely affect the Company’s competitiveness.  Infringement by the Company of third-party intellectual property rights could result in costly litigation and/or the modification or discontinuance of Company products.  

The market for the Company’s products depends to a significant extent upon the value associated with its trademarks and brand names, including ARM & HAMMER, TROJAN, OXICLEAN, L’IL CRITTERS and VITAFUSION. The Company owns the material trademarks and brand names used in connection with the marketing and distribution of its major products both in the U.S. and in other countries. In addition, the Company holds several valuable patents on its products, which the Company believes serve as an effective barrier to entry for new competitors. Accordingly, the Company relies on trademark, trade secret, patent and copyright laws to protect its intellectual property rights. Although most of the Company’s material intellectual property is registered in the U.S. and

24


 

in certain foreign countries in which it operates, it cannot be sure that its intellectual property rights will be effectively utilized or, if necessary, successfully asserted. There is a risk that the Company will not be able to obtain and perfect its own intellectual property rights, or, where appropriate, license from others intellectual property rights necessary to support new product introductions. The Company cannot be sure that these rights, if obtained, will not be invalidated, circumvented or challenged in the future, and the Company could incur significant costs in connection with legal actions relating to such rights. In addition, even if such rights are obtained in the U.S., the laws of some of the other countries in which the Company’s products are or may be sold do not protect intellectual property rights to the same extent as the laws of the U.S. If other parties infringe the Company’s intellectual property rights, they may dilute the value of the Company’s brands in the marketplace, which could diminish the value that consumers associate with the Company’s brands and harm its sales. The Company’s failure to perfect or successfully assert intellectual property rights could make it less competitive and could have a material adverse effect on its business, operating results and financial condition. Also, the Company’s patents are granted for a term of 20 years from the date the patent application is filed. While the Company considers no single patent to be material to the business as a whole, it does recognize that the loss of key patents will allow for increased competition, specifically to its SPINBRUSH battery-powered toothbrush, FIRST RESPONSE pregnancy test kit and ANSWER pregnancy test kit brands. While the Company has obtained and is seeking patent protection for improvements made in these product areas, the Company cannot provide assurance that its patents on such improvements will offer the same level of protection from competition as the patents that are nearing the end of their 20 year terms and expiring.

In addition, if the Company’s products are found to infringe intellectual property rights of others, the owners of those rights could bring legal actions against the Company claiming substantial damages for past infringement and seeking to enjoin manufacturing and marketing of the affected products. If these legal actions are successful, in addition to any potential liability for damages from past infringement, the Company could be required to obtain a license in order to continue to manufacture or market the affected products, potentially adding significant costs. The Company might not prevail in any action brought against it or it may be unsuccessful in securing any license for continued use and therefore have to discontinue the marketing and sale of a product. This could make the Company less competitive and could have a material adverse impact on its business, operating results and financial condition.

·

Impairment of the Company’s goodwill and other intangible assets may result in a reduction in net income.

The Company has a material amount of goodwill, trademarks and other intangible assets, as well as other long-lived assets, which are periodically evaluated for impairment in accordance with current accounting standards. Declines in the Company’s profitability and/or estimated cash flows related to specific intangible assets, as well as potential changes in market valuations for similar assets and market discount rates, has resulted in impairment charges from time to time, and may result in future impairment charges, which could reduce the Company’s net income and otherwise have an adverse impact on operating results.  In 2014, the results of the Company’s annual impairment test for indefinite lived trade names resulted in a personal care trade name whose fair value exceeded its carrying value by 11%.  This trade name is valued at approximately $37 million and is considered an important asset to the Company.  The Company continues to monitor performance and should there be any significant change in forecasted assumptions or estimates, including sales, profitability and discount rate, the Company may be required to recognize an impairment charge.

·

The Company’s operations and the operations of its third party manufacturers, suppliers and customers may be subject to disruption from events beyond its or their control.  

The Company’s operations, as well as the operations of its third party manufacturers, suppliers and customers, may be subject to disruption from a variety of causes, including work stoppages, material shortages, financial difficulties, acts of war, terrorism, pandemics, fire, earthquake, flooding or other natural disasters. If a major disruption were to occur, it could result in harm to people or the natural environment, delays in shipments of products to customers or suspension of operations, any of which could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business.  

·

The Company may not be able to attract, retain and develop key personnel.  

The Company’s future performance depends in significant part upon the continued service of its executive officers and other key personnel. The loss of the services of one or more executive officers or other key employees could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, prospects, financial condition and results of operations. This effect could be exacerbated if any officers or other key personnel left as a group or at the same time. The Company’s success also depends, in part, on its continuing ability to attract, retain and develop highly qualified personnel. Competition for such personnel is intense, and there can be no assurance that the Company can retain its key employees or attract, assimilate and retain other highly qualified personnel in the future.  

 

 

ITEM 1B.

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

Not applicable.

 

25


 

ITEM 2.

PROPERTIES

The Company leases a 250,000 square foot building in Ewing, New Jersey for its global corporate headquarters. The lease expires in 2032, subject to two ten-year extension terms at the option of the Company. The Company’s aggregate lease commitment is approximately $116 million over the lease term.  

In addition, the Company owns a 127,000 square feet facility in Princeton, New Jersey which is occupied by the Company’s research and development and SPD personnel. The Company also owns a 36,000 square foot research and development facility in Cranbury, New Jersey.  

The Company also leases offices in various locations throughout the U.S. and globally.  The Company and its consolidated subsidiaries also own or lease other facilities as set forth in the following table:

 

Location

 

Products Manufactured

 

Segment

 

Approximate

Area (Sq.  Feet)

Owned:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Manufacturing facilities

 

 

 

 

 

 

York, Pennsylvania

 

Liquid laundry detergent and cat litter

 

 

Consumer Domestic and Consumer International

 

450,000

Harrisonville, Missouri

  

Liquid laundry detergent and fabric softener

 

 

Consumer Domestic and Consumer International

 

272,000

Green River, Wyoming

  

Sodium bicarbonate and various consumer products

 

Consumer Domestic, Consumer International and SPD

 

250,000

Lakewood, New Jersey

  

Various consumer products

 

 

Consumer Domestic and Consumer International

 

250,000

Colonial Heights, Virginia

  

Condoms

 

 

Consumer Domestic and Consumer International

 

220,000

Old Fort, Ohio

  

Sodium bicarbonate, rumen bypass fats and various consumer products

 

 

Consumer Domestic, Consumer International and SPD

 

208,000

Montreal, Canada

  

Personal care products

 

Consumer International

 

157,000

Camaçari, Bahia, Brazil

  

Sodium bicarbonate and other products

 

SPD

 

120,000

Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brazil(1)

  

 

 

SPD

 

106,000

Folkestone, England

  

Personal care products

 

Consumer International

 

78,000

Madera, California

  

Rumen bypass fats and related products

 

SPD

 

50,000

Itapura, Bahia, Brazil

 

Barite

 

SPD

 

35,000

New Plymouth, New Zealand (2)

  

Condom processing

 

 

Consumer Domestic and Consumer International

 

31,000

Oskaloosa, Iowa

  

Animal nutrition products

 

SPD

 

27,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Warehouses

  

 

 

 

 

 

York, Pennsylvania

 

 

 

Consumer Domestic and Consumer International

 

650,000

Harrisonville, Missouri

  

 

 

Consumer Domestic and Consumer International

 

282,000

Green River, Wyoming

  

 

 

Consumer Domestic, Consumer International and SPD

 

215,000

Old Fort, Ohio

 

 

Consumer Domestic, Consumer International and SPD

 

90,000

Camaçari, Bahia, Brazil

  

 

SPD

 

39,200

Itapura, Bahia, Brazil

 

 

SPD

 

19,600

Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brazil

  

 

SPD

 

13,100

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leased:

  

 

 

 

 

 

Manufacturing facilities

  

 

 

 

 

 

North Brunswick, New Jersey(3)

  

 

 

 

360,000

26


 

Vancouver, Washington(4)

 

Dietary supplements

 

 

Consumer Domestic and Consumer International

 

206,000

Victorville, California(5)

 

Liquid laundry detergent and cat litter

 

 

Consumer Domestic and Consumer International

 

150,000

Mason City, Iowa(6)

 

Animal nutrition products

 

SPD

 

36,000

Folkestone, England(7)

  

Personal care products

 

Consumer International

 

22,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Warehouses

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fostoria, Ohio(8)    

 

 

 

Consumer Domestic, Consumer International and SPD

 

486,000

Victorville, California(5)

 

 

 

Consumer Domestic and Consumer International

 

300,000

Grandview, Missouri(9)  

 

 

 

Consumer Domestic and Consumer International

 

250,000

Ridgefield, Washington(4)

 

 

 

Consumer Domestic and Consumer International

 

190,000

Mississauga, Canada(10)

  

 

Consumer International

 

123,000

Mason City, Iowa(6)

 

 

 

SPD

 

64,000

Folkestone, England(11)

  

 

Consumer International

 

55,000

Revel, France

  

 

Consumer International

 

48,900

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Offices(14)

  

 

 

 

 

 

Mexico City, Mexico

  

 

Consumer International

 

27,500

Levallois, France

  

 

Consumer International

 

21,600

Mississauga, Canada

 

 

Consumer International

 

17,000

Folkestone, England(12)

 

 

Consumer International

 

11,000

Sydney, Australia(13)

  

 

Consumer International

 

24,900

 

(1)

Manufacturing site is idle, and virtually all equipment has now been removed.

(2)

Land lease expires in March 2025.

(3)

Lease expires in September 2015.  The Company has subleased this building through the end of the lease term.  

(4)

There are a total of seven buildings in Vancouver, Washington and one building in Ridgefield, Washington dedicated to the Company’s dietary supplements business.  All leases have an expiration date of December 2020, except for Ridgefield (March 2018, subject to a 33-month extension at the option of the Company) and two buildings in Vancouver (August 2017, subject to a three-year extension at the option of the Company, and December 2015, respectively).

(5)

Lease expires in April 2024, subject to two five-year extensions at the option of the Company.  

(6)

There are three buildings in Mason City, Iowa dedicated to the Company’s animal nutrition business.  One lease, for two buildings, has an expiration date of November 2019, subject to three five-year extensions at the option of the Company.  The lease for the other building has an expiration date of November 2024, subject to two five- year extensions at the option of the Company.

(7)

Lease expires in April 2022, subject to a break option in 2017.

(8)

Lease expires in November 2015, subject to one four-year extension at the option of the Company.  

(9)

Lease consists of two suites (each approximately 125,000 sq. feet).  One suite expires in May 2015 and the other in May 2016.  The lease is subject to two five-year extensions at the option of the Company.  

(10)

Lease expires in September 2022, subject to two five-year extensions at the option of the Company.

(11)

There are two leased warehouses in Folkestone, England.  One lease expires in March 2028, with break options every five years.  The second lease expires in April 2022, subject to a break option in April 2017.

(12)

Lease expires in November 2024, subject to a break option in December 2020.

(13)

Lease expires in June 2020, subject to a six-year extension at the option of the Company.

(14)

We also lease offices in Brazil and China.

In Syracuse, New York, the Company owns a 21 acre site which includes a group of connected buildings.  This facility was closed in 2001 and a portion of the facility is now leased to a third party.  

Armand, a joint venture in which the Company owns a 50% interest, operates a potassium carbonate manufacturing plant located in Muscle Shoals, Alabama.  This facility contains approximately 53,000 square feet of space and has a production capacity of 103,000 tons of potassium carbonate per year.  

27


 

The Company’s Brazilian subsidiary has its administrative headquarters in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

The Old Fort, Ohio plant has a production capacity for sodium bicarbonate of 280,000 tons per year.  The Green River, Wyoming plant has a production capacity for sodium bicarbonate of 200,000 tons per year.  

The Company believes that its operating and administrative facilities are adequate and suitable for the conduct of its business. The Company also believes that its production facilities are suitable for current manufacturing requirements for its consumer and specialty products businesses. In addition, with the exception of gummy dietary supplements, the facilities possess a capacity sufficient to accommodate the Company’s estimated increases in production requirements over the next several years, based on its current product lines. The Company is currently expanding its gummy dietary supplements production capacity at its York, Pennsylvania manufacturing facility to meet expected future product demand. The new gummy dietary supplements line is expected to start production in the first quarter of 2015.

 

 

ITEM 3.

LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

General

The Company, in the ordinary course of its business is the subject of, or party to, various pending or threatened legal actions, government investigations and proceedings from time to time, including, without limitation, those relating to, commercial transactions, product liability, purported consumer class actions, employment matters, antitrust, environmental, health, safety and other compliance related matters.  Such proceedings are subject to many uncertainties and the outcome of certain pending or threatened legal actions may not be reasonably predictable and any related damages may not be estimable.  Certain legal actions, including those described below, could result in an adverse outcome for the Company, and any such adverse outcome could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.

Brazil Environmental Matters

In 2000, the Company acquired majority ownership in its Brazilian subsidiary, Quimica Geral do Nordeste S.A. (“QGN”). The acquired operations included an inorganic salt manufacturing plant which began site operations in the late 1970’s. Located on the site were two closed landfills, two active landfills and a pond for the management of the process waste streams. In 2009, QGN was advised by the environmental authority in the State of Bahia, the Institute of the Environment (“IMA”), that the plant was discharging contaminants into an adjacent creek. After learning of the discharge, QGN took immediate action to cease the discharge and retained two nationally recognized environmental firms to prepare a site investigation / remedial action plan (“SI/RA”). The SI/RA report was submitted by QGN to IMA in April 2010. The report concluded that the likely sources of the discharge were the failure of the pond and closed landfills. QGN ceased site operations in August 2010. In November 2010, IMA responded to QGN’s recommendation for an additional study by issuing a notification requiring a broad range of remediation measures (the “Remediation Notification”), which included the shutdown and removal of two on-site landfills. In addition, despite repeated discussions with IMA at QGN’s request to consider QGN’s proposed remediation alternatives, in December 2010, IMA imposed a fine of five million Brazilian Real (approximately U.S. $1.9 million at current exchange rates) for the discharge of contaminants above allowable limits. The description of the fine included a reference to aggravating factors that may indicate that local “management’s intent” was considered in determining the severity of the fine, which could result in criminal liability for members of local management. In January 2011, QGN filed with IMA an administrative defense to the fine, suspending any enforcement activities pending its defense. IMA has not yet formally responded to QGN’s administrative defense.

With respect to the Remediation Notification, QGN engaged in discussions with IMA during which QGN asserted that a number of the remediation measures, including the removal of the landfills, and the timeframes for implementation were not appropriate and requested that the Remediation Notification be withdrawn. In response, in February 2011, IMA issued a revised Remediation Notification (the “Revised Remediation Notification”) providing for further site analysis by QGN, including further study of the integrity of the landfills. The Revised Remediation Notification did not include a requirement to remove the landfills; however, it did not foreclose the possibility of such requirement. QGN has responded to the Revised Remediation Notification providing further information regarding the remediation measures, and is in discussions with the Institute of Environment and Waste Management (“INEMA”), successor to IMA, to seek agreement on an appropriate remediation plan. In mid-2011, QGN, consistent with the Revised Remediation Notice, began an additional site investigation and capped the two active landfills. In 2012, QGN drained the waste pond. During the third quarter of 2013, INEMA approved, in writing, the first step in QGN’s proposed remediation plans, the installation of a trench drain to capture and treat groundwater at the site. Construction of the trench drain began during the first quarter of 2014 and is expected to be completed by the end of the first quarter of 2015. In June 2014, QGN formally submitted to INEMA a technical report, including a remediation plan for the site and a proposed agreement regarding the fine and QGN’s ongoing obligations at the site. In July 2014, an initial meeting was held with INEMA to review and discuss the report and the proposed

28


 

agreement. Following the initial meeting, QGN provided additional information requested by INEMA and continues to engage in discussions with INEMA regarding the proposed agreement.

As a result of the foregoing events, the Company accrued approximately $3.0 million in 2009 and $4.8 million in 2010 for remediation, fines and related costs. Since 2009, the costs of remediation activities and foreign exchange rate changes have reduced the accrual by approximately $4.7 million, to a current amount of $3.1 million. As a result of INEMA’s approval of the first step in QGN’s remediation plans, the Company does not believe that it will be required to remove the landfills. However, it remains reasonably possible that INEMA will require such removal, and the Company could be unsuccessful in appealing such decision. The Company estimates the cost of such landfill removal would be in the range of $30 million to $50 million.

ARM & HAMMER ESSENTIALS Natural Deodorant Litigation  

The Company has been named as a defendant in a purported class action lawsuit alleging unfair, deceptive and unlawful business practices with respect to the advertising, marketing and sales of ARM & HAMMER ESSENTIALS Natural Deodorant. Specifically, on March 9, 2012, Plaintiffs Stephen Trewin and Joseph Farhatt, on behalf of themselves and all others similarly situated, filed a complaint against the Company in the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey alleging violations of the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act and violations of the Missouri Merchandising Practices Act.

The complaint alleged, among other things, that the Company used labeling and a marketing and advertising campaign centered around the claim that the ARM & HAMMER ESSENTIALS Natural Deodorant is a “natural” product that contains “natural” ingredients and provides “natural” protection. The complaint alleged that the claim was false and misleading because the product contains artificial and synthetic ingredients. Among other things, the complaint sought an order certifying the case as a class action, appointing Plaintiffs as class representatives and appointing Plaintiffs’ counsel to represent the class. The complaint also sought restitution and disgorgement of all amounts obtained by the Company as a result of the alleged misconduct; compensatory, actual, statutory and other unspecified damages allegedly suffered by Plaintiffs and the purported class; treble damages for alleged violation of the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act; punitive damages for alleged violations of the Missouri Merchandising Practices Act; an order requiring the Company to immediately cease its alleged wrongful conduct; an order requiring the Company to engage in a corrective notice campaign; an order requiring the Company to pay to Plaintiffs and all members of the purported class the amounts paid for ARM & HAMMER ESSENTIALS Natural Deodorant; statutory prejudgment and post-judgment interest; and, reasonable attorneys’ fees and costs.

In January 2014, the case was settled for an immaterial amount, and the settlement was granted preliminary approval by the Court in February 2015.  A final approval hearing regarding the settlement is scheduled for June 4, 2015. If the Court fails to approve the settlement, the Company will continue to vigorously defend itself in this matter. While it is not currently possible to estimate the amount of any damages or determine the impact of any equitable relief that may be granted if the litigation continues and if there is an adverse outcome, such an outcome could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

 

ITEM 4.

MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

 


29


 

PART II

 

 

ITEM 5.

MARKET FOR THE REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

 

 

2014

 

 

2013

 

Common Stock Price Range and Dividends

 

Low

 

 

High

 

 

Dividend

 

 

Low

 

 

High

 

 

Dividend

 

1st Quarter

 

$

61.00

 

 

$

69.44

 

 

$

0.31

 

 

$

53.80

 

 

$

64.69

 

 

$

0.28

 

2nd Quarter

 

$

67.05

 

 

$

70.49

 

 

$

0.31

 

 

$

58.91

 

 

$

65.10

 

 

$

0.28

 

3rd Quarter

 

$

63.85

 

 

$

70.87

 

 

$

0.31

 

 

$

56.36

 

 

$

65.49

 

 

$

0.28

 

4th Quarter

 

$

67.04

 

 

$

80.97

 

 

$

0.31

 

 

$

59.00

 

 

$

66.96

 

 

$

0.28

 

Full Year

 

$

61.00

 

 

$

80.97

 

 

$

1.24

 

 

$

53.80

 

 

$

66.96

 

 

$

1.12

 

 

Based on composite trades reported by the New York Stock Exchange and dividends paid for each fiscal quarter for the years ended December 31, 2014 and 2013.

Approximate number of record holders of the Company’s Common Stock as of December 31, 2014: 1,900.

The following graph compares the yearly change in the cumulative total stockholder return on the Company’s Common Stock for the past five fiscal years with the cumulative total return of the S&P 500 Index and the S&P 500 Household Products Index described more fully below.  The returns are indexed to a value of $100 at December 31, 2009.  Dividend reinvestment has been assumed.  

Comparison of Cumulative Five-Year Total Return among Company, S&P 500 Index and the S&P 500 Household Products Index(1)

(1)

S&P 500 Household Products Index consists of THE CLOROX COMPANY, COLGATE-PALMOLIVE COMPANY, KIMBERLY-CLARK CORPORATION and P&G.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INDEXED RETURNS (Years ending)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Company / Index

 

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Church & Dwight Co., Inc.

 

100.00

115.28

155.36

185.33

233.44

282.70

S&P 500 Index

 

100.00

115.06

117.49

136.29

180.42

205.10

S&P 500 Household Products Index

 

100.00

107.18

118.21

128.58

160.81

184.37


30


 

Share Repurchase Authorization

On January 29, 2014, the Company’s board of directors (“the Board”) authorized a new share repurchase program, under which the Company was authorized to repurchase up to $500 million in shares of Common Stock (the “2014 Share Repurchase Program”), and an evergreen share repurchase program under which the Company may repurchase, from time to time, Common Stock to reduce or eliminate dilution associated with issuances of Common Stock under the Company’s incentive plans.  The 2014 Share Repurchase Program replaced the Company’s share repurchase program announced on November 5, 2012.

 

As part of the evergreen share repurchase program, in early January 2015, the Company purchased 0.5 million shares of Common Stock at a cost of approximately $41.2 million.  The Company used cash on hand to fund the purchase price.

On January 28, 2015, the Board authorized a new share repurchase program, under which the Company may repurchase up to $500 million in shares of Common Stock (the “2015 Share Repurchase Program”).  The 2015 Share Repurchase Program replaced the 2014 Share Repurchase Program and the Company continued its evergreen share repurchase program.  

As part of the 2015 Share Repurchase Program and the evergreen share repurchase program, in early February 2015, the Company entered into an accelerated share repurchase contract with a commercial bank to purchase $215 million of Common Stock.  The Company paid $215 million to the bank and received an initial delivery of approximately 2.6 million shares of Common Stock. The contract will be settled by mid-May 2015.  If the Company is required to deliver value to the bank at the end of the purchase period, the Company, at its option, may elect to settle in shares of Common Stock or cash.

Of the 2015 share repurchases, approximately $88.0 million was purchased under the Company’s evergreen share repurchase program.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Period

 

Total

Number of

Shares

Purchased

 

Average

Price Paid

per Share

 

Total Number of

Shares Purchased

as Part of Publicly

Announced Plans

or Programs

 

Approximate Dollar

Value of Shares that

May Yet Be Purchased Under All

Programs as of

December 31, 2014

12/1/2014 to 12/31/2014

 

560,499

 

$            78.11

 

560,499

 

$         107,200,000

Total

 

560,499

 

$            78.11

 

560,499

 

 

 


31


 

ITEM 6.

SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following selected historical consolidated financial data should be read in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements and related notes to those statements included in this Annual Report.  The selected historical consolidated financial data for the periods presented have been derived from the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements.

CHURCH & DWIGHT CO., INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

FIVE‑YEAR FINANCIAL REVIEW

(Dollars in millions, except per share data and employees)

 

 

 

2014 (1)

 

 

2013 (1)

 

 

2012 (1)

 

 

2011 (1)

 

 

2010 (1)

 

Operating Results

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net Sales

 

$

3,297.6

 

 

 

3,194.3

 

 

 

2,921.9

 

 

 

2,749.3

 

 

 

2,589.2

 

Marketing expenses

 

$

416.9

 

 

 

399.8

 

 

 

357.3

 

 

 

354.1

 

 

 

338.0

 

Research and development expenses

 

$

59.8

 

 

 

61.8

 

 

 

54.8

 

 

 

55.1

 

 

 

53.7

 

Income from Operations(2,3)

 

$

641.2

 

 

 

622.2

 

 

 

545.1

 

 

 

492.6

 

 

 

445.0

 

% of Sales

 

 

19.4

%

 

 

19.5

%

 

 

18.7

%

 

 

17.9

%

 

 

17.2

%

Net Income (2,3,5)

 

$

413.9

 

 

 

394.4

 

 

 

349.8

 

 

 

309.6

 

 

 

270.7

 

Net Income per Share-Basic (5)

 

$

3.06

 

 

 

2.85

 

 

 

2.50

 

 

 

2.16

 

 

 

1.91

 

Net Income per Share-Diluted (5)

 

$

3.01

 

 

 

2.79

 

 

 

2.45

 

 

 

2.12

 

 

 

1.87

 

Financial Position

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Assets

 

$

4,381.3

 

 

 

4,259.7

 

 

 

4,098.1

 

 

 

3,117.6

 

 

 

2,945.2

 

Total Debt (3)

 

$

1,095.2

 

 

 

803.3

 

 

 

903.2

 

 

 

252.3

 

 

 

339.7

 

Total Stockholders' Equity

 

$

2,101.9

 

 

 

2,300.0

 

 

 

2,061.1

 

 

 

2,040.8

 

 

 

1,870.9

 

Total Debt as a % of Total Capitalization

 

 

34

%

 

 

26

%

 

 

30

%

 

 

11

%

 

 

15

%

Other Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Average Common Shares Outstanding-Basic

 

 

135.1

 

 

 

138.6

 

 

 

140.1

 

 

 

143.2

 

 

 

142.0

 

Cash Dividends Paid

 

$

167.5

 

 

 

155.2

 

 

 

134.5

 

 

 

97.4

 

 

 

44.0

 

Cash Dividends Paid per Common Share

 

$

1.24

 

 

 

1.12

 

 

 

0.96

 

 

 

0.68

 

 

 

0.31

 

Stockholders' Equity per Common Share

 

$

15.56

 

 

 

16.59

 

 

 

14.71

 

 

 

14.25

 

 

 

13.17

 

Additions to Property, Plant & Equipment (4)

 

$

70.5

 

 

 

67.1

 

 

 

74.5

 

 

 

76.6

 

 

 

63.8

 

Depreciation & Amortization

 

$

91.2

 

 

 

90.5

 

 

 

85.0

 

 

 

77.1

 

 

 

71.6

 

Employees at Year-End

 

 

4,145

 

 

 

4,177

 

 

 

4,354

 

 

 

3,457

 

 

 

3,543

 

 

(1)

Period to period comparisons of the data presented above are impacted by the effect of acquisitions and divestitures made by the Company.  For further explanation of the impact of the acquisitions occurring in 2012 and 2011, refer to Note 6 to the consolidated financial statements.

(2)

2010 results include a pension settlement charge of approximately $24 pre-tax ($15.5 after tax).

(3)

2014 results reflect an increase of $300 and its impact on interest expense due to the acquisition of assets of Lil’ Drug Store Brands.  2012 results reflect an increase of $650 in debt and its impact on interest expense due to the acquisition of Avid Health, and 2010 results reflect a reduction in debt due to $408 outstanding balance under, and termination of, the Company's term loan provided by a syndicate of banks.

(4)

2014 results include approximately $34.0 for expenditures for the gummy dietary supplement product line expansion at the York facilities.  2012 results include $37.8 for expenditures for the Victorville facility.

(5)

2011 results include a $13 or $0.09 per share charge associated with an international deferred tax valuation allowance.

 

 

 


 

32


CHURCH & DWIGHT CO., INC AND SUBSIDIARIES

(Dollars in millions, except share and per share data)

 

ITEM 7.

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations should be read in conjunction with the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

OVERVIEW

The Company’s Business

The Company develops, manufactures, markets and sells a broad range of household, personal care and specialty products.  The Company sells its consumer products under a variety of brands through a broad distribution platform that includes supermarkets, mass merchandisers, wholesale clubs, drugstores, convenience stores, home stores, dollar, pet and other specialty stores, and websites, all of which sell the products to consumers.  The Company also sells specialty products to industrial customers and distributors.  The Company focuses its consumer products marketing efforts principally on its “power brands.”  These well-recognized brand names include ARM & HAMMER (used in multiple product categories such as baking soda, cat litter, carpet deodorization and laundry detergent), TROJAN condoms, lubricants and vibrators, OXICLEAN stain removers, cleaning solutions, laundry detergent, dishwashing detergent and bleach alternatives, SPINBRUSH battery-operated and manual toothbrushes,  FIRST RESPONSE home pregnancy and ovulation test kits, NAIR depilatories, ORAJEL oral analgesics, XTRA laundry detergent, and L’IL CRITTERS and VITAFUSION gummy dietary supplements.  The Company considers four of these brands to be “mega brands”: ARM & HAMMER, OXICLEAN, TROJAN, and L’IL CRITTERS and VITAFUSION, and is giving greatest focus to the growth of these brands.

The Company operates its business in three segments: Consumer Domestic, Consumer International and SPD.  The Consumer Domestic segment includes the power brands noted above and other household and personal care products such as SCRUB FREE, KABOOM and ORANGE GLO cleaning products, ARRID antiperspirant, CLOSE-UP and AIM toothpastes and SIMPLY SALINE nasal saline moisturizer.  The Consumer International segment primarily sells a variety of personal care products, some of which use the same brand names as the Company’s domestic product lines, in international markets including Canada, France, Australia, the United Kingdom, Mexico and Brazil.  The SPD segment is the largest U.S. producer of sodium bicarbonate, which it sells together with other specialty inorganic chemicals for a variety of industrial, institutional, medical and food applications.  This segment also sells a range of animal nutrition and specialty cleaning products.  In 2014, the Consumer Domestic, Consumer International and SPD segments represented approximately 75%, 16% and 9%, respectively, of the Company’s consolidated net sales.

2014 Financial Highlights

Key fiscal year 2014 financial results include:

·

2014 net sales grew 3.2% over fiscal year 2013, with gains in all three of the Company’s segments, primarily due to volume growth and the impact of the 2014 acquisition of the Lil’ Drug Store brands, partially offset by higher promotional spending and currency fluctuations.

·

Gross margin decreased 90 basis points to 44.1% in fiscal year 2014 from 45.0% in fiscal year 2013, reflecting higher promotional spending in support of new and existing products, higher commodity costs and currency fluctuations.

·

Operating margin decreased 10 basis points to 19.4% in fiscal year 2014 from 19.5% in fiscal year 2013, reflecting a lower gross margin and slightly higher marketing costs, partially offset by lower selling, general and administrative expenses (“SG&A”).

·

The Company achieved diluted net earnings per share in fiscal year 2014 of $3.01, an increase of approximately 8.0% from fiscal year 2013 diluted net earnings per share of $2.79.

·

Cash from operations was $540.3, a $40.7 increase from the prior year, which includes the deferral of a $36 payment relating to December 2012 estimated federal tax paid in the first quarter of 2013 as a result of Hurricane Sandy relief.

·

The Company returned $646 to its stockholders through dividends and share repurchases.

Strategic Goals, Challenges and Initiatives

The Company’s ability to generate sales depends on consumer demand for its products and retail customers’ decisions to carry its products, which are, in part, affected by general economic conditions in its markets.  In 2014, many of the markets in which the

33


CHURCH & DWIGHT CO., INC AND SUBSIDIARIES

(Dollars in millions, except share and per share data)

 

Company operates continued to experience general economic softness and weak or inconsistent consumer demand.  Although the Company’s consumer products generally are consumer staples and less vulnerable to decreases in discretionary spending than other products, the continued economic downturn has reduced demand in many categories, particularly those in personal care, and affected Company sales in recent periods.  Some customers have responded to economic conditions by increasing their private label offerings (primarily in the dietary supplements, diagnostic kits and oral analgesics categories), and consolidating the product selections they offer to the top few leading brands in each category.  In addition, an increasing portion of the Company’s product categories are being sold by club stores, dollar stores and mass merchandisers.  These customer actions have placed downward pressure on the Company’s sales and gross margins.

The Company expects a competitive marketplace in 2015 due to new product introductions by competitors and continuing aggressive competitive pricing pressures.  In the U.S., an improving unemployment rate and higher disposable income due to low gasoline prices are expected to have a positive effect on consumption patterns in the second half of 2015.  To continue to deliver attractive results for stockholders in this environment, the Company intends to continue to aggressively pursue several key strategic initiatives: maintain competitive marketing and trade spending, tightly control its cost structure, continue to develop and launch new and differentiated products, and pursue strategic acquisitions.  The Company also intends to continue to grow its product sales geographically (in an attempt to mitigate the impact of weakness in any one area), and maintain an offering of premium and value brand products (to appeal to a wide range of consumers).

The Company continues to experience heightened competitive activity in certain product categories from other larger multinational competitors, some of which have greater resources.  Such activities have included new product introductions, more aggressive product claims and marketing challenges, as well as increased promotional spending.  Since the 2012 introduction in the U.S. of unit dose laundry detergent by various manufacturers, including the Company, there has been significant product and price competition in the laundry detergent category, contributing to an overall category decline.  During 2012, 2013 and 2014 the category declined by 0.6%, 3.2% and 2.9%, respectively.  

In 2014, P&G, one of the Company’s major competitors and the market leader in premium laundry detergent, including unit dose laundry detergent, reconfigured certain of its product offerings and related marketing and pricing strategies and launched various products to compete more directly with the Company’s core ARM & HAMMER, XTRA and OXICLEAN power brands.  For example, P&G launched a lower-priced line of laundry detergents to compete directly with the Company’s core value laundry detergents, and launched a versatile stain remover to compete with OXICLEAN, the Company’s pre-wash additive.  

The Company responded to these competitive pressures by, among other things, focusing on strengthening its key brands, including increased focus on the ARM & HAMMER, OXICLEAN, TROJAN and L’IL CRITTERS and VITAFUSION mega brands, which each span various product categories, including premium and value household products, and represented approximately 60% of the Company’s sales and profits in 2014, through the launch of innovative new products and strong sales execution supported by increased marketing and trade spending.  These mega brands have advantages over other power brands, including the ability to leverage research and development and marketing investments and lower overhead costs across mega brand categories.  For example, the Company’s 2014 responsive product introductions include the simultaneous launch of OXICLEAN branded products into the mid/premium tier laundry detergent segment, and auto dish detergent category and bleach alternatives with continued support of, and innovation in, the Company’s base ARM &HAMMER and OXICLEAN businesses, to create scale and maximize marketing efforts.  In 2015, the Company intends to continue to heavily invest in the OXICLEAN brand as 2015 marks the second year of the Company’s goal to establish OXICLEAN as a mega brand in multiple categories.  Mega brand launches and launches of other products are anticipated to contribute more incremental new product revenue than the introduction of new products has in prior years, and a significant portion of those revenues will include expansion into new categories with premium household products, supported by increased levels of slotting, trade promotions and incremental marketing support and planned ongoing technology investment.  There can be no assurance that these measures will be successful.  

Despite challenging economic conditions and customer responses to these conditions, the Company was able to grow market share in six of nine of its “power brands” in 2014, including in the laundry detergent category.  The Company’s global product portfolio consists of both premium (60% of total worldwide consumer revenue in 2014) and value (40% of total worldwide consumer revenue in 2014) brands, which it believes enables it to succeed in a range of economic environments.  The Company’s value brands have performed strongly during economic downturns, and the Company intends to continue to develop a portfolio of appealing new products to build loyalty among cost-conscious consumers.

Over the past 15 years, the Company has diversified from an almost exclusively U.S. business to a global company with approximately 16% of sales derived from foreign countries in 2014.  The Company has operations in six countries (Canada, Mexico, U.K., France, Australia and Brazil) and exports to over 90 other countries.  In 2014, the Company benefited from its concentration in North America in light of the economic downturn in Europe; however, the Company has continued and will continue to focus on

34


CHURCH & DWIGHT CO., INC AND SUBSIDIARIES

(Dollars in millions, except share and per share data)

 

selectively expanding its global business.  Net sales generated outside of the United States are exposed to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations as well as political uncertainty which could impact future operating results.  

The Company also continues to focus on controlling its costs.  The Company experienced continued high raw material and energy costs throughout 2014.  Historically, the Company has been able to mitigate the effects of cost increases primarily by implementing cost reduction programs and, to a lesser extent, by passing along some of these cost increases to customers.  The Company has also entered into set pricing and pre-buying arrangements with certain suppliers and hedge agreements for diesel fuel.  The Company expects by the second half of 2015 to benefit from macro trends, including an improving U.S. economy, lower commodity prices and productivity programs.  

Additionally, maintaining tight controls on overhead costs has been a hallmark of the Company and has enabled it to effectively navigate recent challenging economic conditions.  

The identification and integration of strategic acquisitions are an important component of the Company’s overall strategy.  Acquisitions have added significantly to Company sales and profits over the last decade.  However, the failure to effectively integrate any acquisition or achieve expected synergies may cause the Company to incur material asset write-downs.  The Company actively seeks acquisitions that fit its guidelines, and its strong financial position provides it with flexibility to take advantage of acquisition opportunities.  In addition, the Company’s ability to quickly integrate acquisitions and leverage existing infrastructure has enabled it to establish a strong track record in making accretive acquisitions.  Since 2001, the Company has acquired eight of its nine “power brands”.    

The Company believes it is positioned to meet the ongoing challenges described above due to its strong financial condition, experience operating in challenging environments and continued focus on key strategic initiatives: maintaining competitive marketing and trade spending, managing its cost structure, continuing to develop and launch new and differentiated products, and pursuing strategic acquisitions.  This focus, together with the strength of the Company’s portfolio of premium and value brands, has enabled the Company to succeed in a range of economic environments, and is expected to position the Company to continue to increase stockholder value over the long-term.  Moreover, the generation of a significant amount of cash from operations, as a result of net income and effective working capital management, combined with an investment grade credit rating provides the Company with the financial flexibility to pursue acquisitions, drive new product development, make capital expenditures to support organic growth and gross margin improvements, return cash to stockholders through dividends and  share buy backs, and reduce outstanding debt, positioning it to continue to create stockholder value.  

For information regarding risks and uncertainties that could materially adversely affect the Company’s business, results of operations and financial condition, see “Risk Factors” in Item 1A of this Annual Report.

Recent Developments

Acquisitions

Lil’ Drug Store Brands Acquisition

On September 19, 2014, the Company acquired certain feminine care brands, including REPHRESH and REPLENS, from Lil’ Drug Store Products, Inc., (the “Lil’ Drug Store Brands Acquisition”) for cash consideration of $215.7.  The Company paid for the acquisition with additional debt.  The annual sales of the acquired brands are approximately $46.0.  These feminine care brands are managed within the Consumer Domestic and Consumer International segments.

VI-COR Acquisition

On January 2, 2015, the Company acquired certain assets of Varied Industries Corporation (the “VI-COR Acquisition”), a manufacturer and seller of feed ingredients for cows, beef cattle, poultry and other livestock.  The total purchase price was approximately $75, which is subject to adjustment based on the closing working capital of VI-COR, and a $5 payment after one year if certain operating performance is achieved. The Company financed the acquisition with available cash. VI-COR’s annual sales are approximately $25.  These brands will be managed within the Specialty Products segment.

35


CHURCH & DWIGHT CO., INC AND SUBSIDIARIES

(Dollars in millions, except share and per share data)

 

Dividend Increase and Share Repurchase Authorization

On January 28, 2015 the Board declared an 8% increase in the regular quarterly dividend from $0.31 to $0.335 per share, equivalent to an annual dividend of $1.34 per share payable to stockholders of record as of February 10, 2015.  The increase raises the annual dividend payout from $168 to approximately $177.

On January 28, 2015, the Board authorized the 2015 Share Repurchase Program which replaces the Company’s 2014 Share Repurchase Program.  In 2014, the Company purchased 6.9 million shares at an aggregate cost of approximately $479 of which $393 was purchased under the 2014 Share Repurchase Program and $86 was purchased under the evergreen share repurchase program, under which the Company may, from time to time, repurchase shares of Common Stock to reduce or eliminate dilution associated with issuances of Common Stock under the Company’s incentive plans.  

As part of the evergreen share repurchase program, in early January 2015, the Company purchased 0.5 million shares of Common Stock at a cost of approximately $41.2.  The Company used cash on hand to fund the purchase price.

As part of the 2015 Share Repurchase Program and the evergreen share repurchase program, in February 2015, the Company entered into an accelerated share repurchase contract with a commercial bank to purchase $215 of the Company’s common stock.  The Company paid $215 to the bank, inclusive of fees, and received an initial delivery of approximately 2.6 million shares. The contract will be settled by mid-May 2015.  If the Company is required to deliver value to the bank at the end of the purchase period, the Company, at its option, may elect to settle in shares of Common Stock or cash.  

Of the 2015 share repurchases, approximately $88.0 was purchased under the Company’s evergreen share repurchase program.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES

The Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S. (GAAP).  The preparation of these financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities.  By their nature, these judgments are subject to uncertainty.  They are based on the Company’s historical experience, its observation of trends in industry, information provided by its customers and information available from other outside sources, as appropriate.  The Company’s significant accounting policies and estimates are described below.  

Revenue Recognition and Promotional and Sales Return Reserves

Virtually all of the Company’s revenue represents sales of finished goods inventory and is recognized when received or picked up by the Company’s customers.  The reserves for consumer and trade promotion liabilities and sales returns are established based on the Company’s best estimate of the amounts necessary to settle future and existing claims on products sold as of the balance sheet date.  Promotional reserves are provided for sales incentives, such as coupons to consumers, and sales incentives provided to customers (such as slotting, cooperative advertising, incentive discounts based on volume of sales and other arrangements made directly with customers).  All such costs are netted against sales.  Slotting costs are recorded when the product is delivered to the customer.  Cooperative advertising costs are recorded when the customer places the advertisement for the Company’s products.  Discounts relating to price reduction arrangements are recorded when the related sale takes place.  Costs associated with end-aisle or other in-store displays are recorded when product that is subject to the promotion is sold.  The Company relies on historical experience and forecasted data to determine the required reserves.  For example, the Company uses historical experience to project coupon redemption rates to determine reserve requirements.  Based on the total face value of Consumer Domestic coupons redeemed over the past several years, if the actual rate of redemptions were to deviate by 0.1% from the rate for which reserves are accrued in the financial statements, an approximately $5.4 difference in the reserve required for coupons would result.  With regard to other promotional reserves and sales returns, the Company uses experience-based estimates, customer and sales organization inputs and historical trend analysis in arriving at the reserves required.  If the Company’s estimates for promotional activities and sales returns were to change by 10% the impact to promotional spending and sales return accruals would be approximately $6.2.  While management believes that its promotional and sales returns reserves are reasonable and that appropriate judgments have been made, estimated amounts could differ materially from actual future obligations.  During the twelve months ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, the Company reduced promotion liabilities by approximately $6.7, $3.7 and $4.0, respectively, based on a change in estimate as a result of actual experience and updated information.  These adjustments are immaterial relative to the amount of trade promotion expense incurred annually by the Company.  

36


CHURCH & DWIGHT CO., INC AND SUBSIDIARIES

(Dollars in millions, except share and per share data)

 

Impairment of goodwill, trade names and other intangible assets and property, plant and equipment

Carrying values of goodwill, trade names and other indefinite lived intangible assets are reviewed periodically for possible impairment.  For finite intangible assets, the Company assesses business triggering events.  The Company’s impairment analysis is based on a discounted cash flow approach that requires significant judgment with respect to unit volume, revenue and expense growth rates, and the selection of an appropriate discount rate.  Management uses estimates based on expected trends in making these assumptions.  With respect to goodwill, impairment occurs when the carrying value of the reporting unit exceeds the discounted present value of cash flows for that reporting unit.  For trade names and other intangible assets, an impairment charge is recorded for the difference between the carrying value and the net present value of estimated future cash flows, which represents the estimated fair value of the asset.  Judgment is required in assessing whether assets may have become impaired between annual valuations.  Indicators such as unexpected adverse economic factors, unanticipated technological change, distribution losses, or competitive activities and acts by governments and courts may indicate that an asset has become impaired.  The result of the Company’s annual goodwill impairment test determined that the estimated fair value substantially exceeded the carrying values of all reporting units.  In addition, there were no goodwill impairment charges for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2014.

The Company recognized intangible asset impairment charges within SG&A for each of the years in the three-year period ended December 31, 2014 as follows:

 

 

For the Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

 

2013

 

 

2012

 

Segments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer Domestic

 

$

5.0

 

 

$

1.9

 

 

$

0.0

 

Consumer International

 

 

0.0

 

 

 

4.6

 

 

 

0.0

 

Total

 

$

5.0

 

 

$

6.5

 

 

$

0.0

 

 

The impairment charges recorded in 2014 and 2013 were a result of actual and projected reductions in sales and profitability as a result of increased competition.  The amount of the impairment charges was determined by comparing the estimated fair value of the assets to their carrying amount.  Fair value was estimated based on a “relief from royalty” or “excess earnings” discounted cash flow method, which contains numerous variables that are subject to change as business conditions change, and therefore could impact fair values in the future.  The Company determined that the fair value of all other intangible assets as of December 31, 2014 exceeded their respective carrying values based upon the forecasted cash flows and profitability.  In 2014, the results of the Company’s annual impairment test for indefinite lived trade names resulted in a personal care trade name whose fair value exceeded its carrying value by 11%.  This trade name is valued at approximately $37 and is considered an important asset to the Company.  The Company continues to monitor performance and should there be any significant change in forecasted assumptions or estimates, including sales, profitability and discount rate, the Company may be required to recognize an impairment charge.    

It is possible that the Company’s conclusions regarding impairment or recoverability of goodwill or other intangible assets could change in future periods if, for example, (i) the businesses or brands do not perform as projected, (ii) overall economic conditions in 2015 or future years vary from current assumptions (including changes in discount rates), (iii) business conditions or strategies change from current assumptions, (iv) investors require higher rates of return on equity investments in the marketplace or (v) enterprise values of comparable publicly traded companies, or actual sales transactions of comparable companies, were to decline, resulting in lower multiples of revenues and EBITDA.  A future impairment charge for goodwill or intangible assets could have a material effect on the Company’s consolidated financial position or results of operations.

Property, plant and equipment and other long-lived assets are reviewed whenever events or changes in circumstances occur that indicate possible impairment.  The Company’s impairment review is based on an undiscounted cash flow analysis at the lowest level at which cash flows of the long-lived assets are largely independent of other groups of Company assets and liabilities.  The analysis requires management judgment with respect to changes in technology, the continued success of product lines, and future volume, revenue and expense growth rates.  The Company conducts annual reviews to identify idle and underutilized equipment, and reviews business plans for possible impairment implications.  Impairment occurs when the carrying value of the asset exceeds the future undiscounted cash flows.  When an impairment is indicated, the estimated future cash flows are then discounted to determine the estimated fair value of the asset and an impairment charge is recorded for the difference between the carrying value and fair value.  

37


CHURCH & DWIGHT CO., INC AND SUBSIDIARIES

(Dollars in millions, except share and per share data)

 

The Company recognized charges related to plant impairment and equipment obsolescence, which occurs in the ordinary course of business for each of the years in the three-year period, ended December 31, 2014 as follows: 

 

 

 

For the Year Ended December 31,

 

 

 

2014

 

 

2013

 

 

2012

 

Segments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer Domestic

 

$

1.2

 

 

$

1.7

 

 

$

1.6

 

Consumer International

 

 

0.2

 

 

 

0.0

 

 

 

0.4

 

Specialty Products

 

 

0.0

 

 

 

0.1

 

 

 

0.1

 

Total

 

$

1.4

 

 

$

1.8

 

 

$

2.1

 

The impairment charges in 2014 and 2013, and the Consumer Domestic and SPD impairment charges in 2012 are due to idling of equipment.  The 2012 Consumer International charge is due to the cancelation of a software project.  The estimates and assumptions used in connection with impairment analyses are consistent with the business plans and estimates that the Company uses to manage its business operations.  Nevertheless, future outcomes may differ materially from management’s estimates.  If the Company’s products fail to achieve estimated volume and pricing targets, market conditions unfavorably change or other significant estimates are not realized, then the Company’s revenue and cost forecasts may not be achieved, and the Company may be required to recognize additional impairment charges.

Inventory valuation

When appropriate, the Company writes down the carrying value of its inventory to the lower of cost or market (net realizable value, which reflects any costs to sell or dispose).  The Company identifies any slow moving, obsolete or excess inventory to determine whether an adjustment is required to establish a new carrying value.  The determination of whether inventory items are slow moving, obsolete or in excess of needs requires estimates and assumptions about the future demand for the Company’s products, technological changes, and new product introductions.  In addition, the Company’s allowance for obsolescence may be impacted by the reduction of the number of stock keeping units (SKUs).  The Company evaluates its inventory levels and expected usage on a periodic basis and records adjustments as required.  Adjustments to inventory to reflect a reduction in net realizable value were $8.3 at December 31, 2014, and $10.1 at December 31, 2013.  

Valuation of pension and postretirement benefit costs

The Company’s pension costs relate solely to its international operations.  Both pension and postretirement benefit costs are developed from actuarial valuations.  Inherent in benefit cost valuations are key assumptions provided by the Company to its actuaries, including the discount rate and expected long-term rate of return on plan assets.  Material changes in the Company’s international pension and domestic/international postretirement benefit costs may occur in the future due to changes in these assumptions as well as fluctuations in plan assets.  

The discount rate is subject to change each year, consistent with changes in applicable high-quality, long-term corporate bond indices. Based on the expected duration of the benefit payments for the Company’s pension plans and postretirement plans, the Company refers to an applicable index and expected term of benefit payments to select a discount rate at which it believes the plan benefits could be effectively settled.  The Company’s weighted average discount rate for its international pension plans as of December 31, 2014 is 3.54% as compared to 4.48% used at December 31, 2013.  Based on the published rate as of December 31, 2014 that matched estimated cash flows for the plans, the Company used a weighted average discount rate of 3.77% for its postretirement plans as compared to 4.56% used at December 31, 2013.  

The expected long-term rate of return on international pension plan assets is selected by taking into account the historical trend, the expected duration of the projected benefit obligation for the plans, the asset mix of the plans and known economic and market conditions at the time of valuation.  Based on these factors, the Company’s weighted average expected long-term rate of return for assets of its pension plans for 2014 was 6.16%, compared to 5.45% used in 2013.  A 50 basis point change in the expected long-term rate of return would result in an approximate $0.5 change in pension expense for 2015.

As noted above, changes in assumptions used by management may result in material changes in the Company’s pension and postretirement benefit costs.  In 2014, other comprehensive income reflected a $1.3 increase in its remaining pension plan obligations and a $4.4 increase for postretirement benefit plans.  The changes are related to the change in discount rates for all plans and other actuarial assumptions.

38


CHURCH & DWIGHT CO., INC AND SUBSIDIARIES

(Dollars in millions, except share and per share data)

 

The Company made cash contributions of approximately $3.3 to its pension plans in 2014.  The Company estimates it will be required to make cash contributions to its pension plans of approximately $2.4 in 2015 to offset 2015 benefit payments and administrative costs in excess of investment returns.  

On December 31, 2014, the Company terminated an international defined benefit pension plan under which approximately 280 participants, including approximately 100 active employees, have accrued benefits.  The Company anticipates completing the termination of this plan by the end of the second quarter of 2015, once regulatory approvals are obtained.  To effect the termination, the Company estimates, based on December 31, 2014 valuations, that the plan has sufficient assets to purchase annuities for retired participants and make certain deposits to the existing defined contribution plan of active employee participants.  The Company estimates that it will incur a one-time non-cash expense of approximately $8 to $11 ($6 to $8 after tax) in 2015 when the plan settlement is completed.  This expense is primarily attributable to pension settlement accounting rules which require accelerated recognition of actuarial losses that were to be amortized over the expected benefit lives of participants.  The estimated expense is subject to change based on valuations at the actual date of settlement.

Income Taxes

Income taxes are accounted for under the asset and liability method.  Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized to reflect the future tax consequences attributable to the differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases, and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards.  Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which the differences are expected to be recovered or settled.  Management provides a valuation allowance against deferred tax assets for amounts which are not considered “more likely than not” to be realized.  The Company records liabilities for potential assessments in various tax jurisdictions under U.S. GAAP guidelines.  The liabilities relate to tax return positions that, although supportable by the Company, may be challenged by the tax authorities and do not meet the minimum recognition threshold required under applicable accounting guidance for the related tax benefit to be recognized in the income statement.  The Company adjusts this liability as a result of changes in tax legislation, interpretations of laws by courts, rulings by tax authorities, changes in estimates and the expiration of the statute of limitations.  Many of the judgments involved in adjusting the liability involve assumptions and estimates that are highly uncertain and subject to change.  In this regard, settlement of any issue, or an adverse determination in litigation, with a taxing authority could require the use of cash and result in an increase in the Company’s annual tax rate.  Conversely, favorable resolution of an issue with a taxing authority would be recognized as a reduction to the Company’s annual tax rate.

New Accounting Pronouncements

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board issued new guidance that clarifies the principles for recognizing revenue.  The new guidance provides that an entity should recognize revenue for the transfer of goods or services equal to the amount that it expects to receive for those goods or services.  The new guidance is effective for annual and interim periods beginning after December 15, 2016, and allows companies to apply the requirements retrospectively, either to all prior periods presented or through a cumulative adjustment in the year of adoption.  Early adoption is not allowed.  The Company is currently evaluating the impact, if any, that the adoption of the new guidance will have on its consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

There have been no other accounting pronouncements issued but not yet adopted by the Company which are expected to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

 

 

 

39


CHURCH & DWIGHT CO., INC AND SUBSIDIARIES

(Dollars in millions, except share and per share data)

 

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2014, 2013 AND 2012

The discussion of results of operations at the consolidated level presented below is followed by a more detailed discussion of results of operations by segment.  The discussion of the Company’s consolidated results of operations and segment operating results is presented on a historical basis for the years ending December 31, 2014, 2013, and 2012.  The segment discussion also addresses certain product line information.  The Company’s operating units are consistent with its reportable segments.  

Consolidated results

2014 compared to 2013

Net Sales

Net sales for the year ended December 31, 2014 were $3,297.6, an increase of $103.3, or approximately 3.2% as compared to 2013 net sales.  The components of the net sales increase are as follows:

 

 

 

December 31,

 

Net Sales - Consolidated

 

2014

 

Product volumes sold

 

 

4.4

%

Pricing/Product mix

 

 

(0.9

%)

Foreign exchange rate fluctuations

 

 

(0.5

%)

Acquired product lines(1)

 

 

0.4

%

Divested product lines / other

 

 

(0.2

%)

Net Sales increase

 

 

3.2

%

(1)

On September 19, 2014, the Company acquired certain feminine care brands from Lil’ Drug Store Products Inc. (“Lil’ Drug Store Brands Acquisition”).  Net sales of the brands acquired in the Lil’ Drug Store Brands Acquisition are included in the Company’s results since the date of acquisition.

All three segments reported volume increases. The unfavorable price/mix in the Consumer Domestic segment, primarily due to new product introductory costs and a higher level of trade and coupon promotion for existing products, was partially offset by favorable price/mix in SPD.

Gross Profit

The Company’s gross profit for 2014 was $1,452.9, a $14.9 increase as compared to the same period in 2013 due to the effect of higher sales volume, productivity improvement programs and the impact of the Lil’ Drug Store Brands Acquisition, partially offset by the costs associated with new product launches, higher commodity costs and currency fluctuations. Gross margin was 44.1% in 2014 as compared to 45.0% in 2013.  Gross margin was lower due to higher trade promotion, coupon, slotting, commodity costs and currency fluctuations, partially offset by the positive impact of productivity improvement programs.

Operating Costs

Marketing expenses for 2014 were $416.9, an increase of $17.1 as compared to 2013 due primarily to expenses in support of new product launches and increased expenses in certain other power brands.  Marketing expenses as a percentage of net sales were 12.6% in 2014 as compared to 12.5% in 2013.

SG&A expenses for 2014 were $394.8, a decrease of $21.2 as compared to 2013 due primarily to lower compensation costs and employee benefit costs, lower legal costs, lower intangible asset impairment charges and lower cease use charges associated with the Company’s Princeton, New Jersey leased buildings, partially offset by higher intangible amortization expense, in part due to the Lil’ Drug Store Brands Acquisition.  Additionally, in 2013 the Company incurred costs related to the integration of the gummy dietary supplements business, which were not incurred in 2014.  SG&A as a percentage of net sales was 12.1% in 2014 as compared to 13.0% in 2013.

Other Income and Expenses

Equity in earnings of affiliates for 2014 was $11.6 as compared to $2.8 in 2013.  The increase in earnings was due primarily to profit improvement from Armand and a smaller loss at Natronx.  Also, in the second quarter of 2013, the Company recorded an impairment charge associated with one of its affiliates.

40


CHURCH & DWIGHT CO., INC AND SUBSIDIARIES

(Dollars in millions, except share and per share data)

 

Interest expense in 2014 was $27.4, a decrease of $0.3 compared to 2013.  

Taxation

The 2014 tax rate was 33.8% as compared to 34.0% in 2013.  

2013 compared to 2012

Net Sales

Net sales for the year ended December 31, 2013 were $3,194.3, an increase of $272.4 or approximately 9.3% as compared to 2012 net sales.  The components of the net sales increase are as follows:

 

 

 

December 31,

 

Net Sales - Consolidated

 

2013

 

Product volumes sold

 

 

3.8

%

Pricing/Product mix

 

 

(1.9

%)

Foreign exchange rate fluctuations

 

 

(0.5

%)

Acquired product lines(1)

 

 

7.6

%

Sales in anticipation of information systems upgrade

 

 

0.3

%

Net Sales increase

 

 

9.3

%

(1)

On October 1, 2012, the Company acquired the L’IL CRITTERS and VITAFUSION gummy dietary supplement business.  Net sales of these product lines are included in the Company’s results since the date of acquisition.

The volume change primarily reflects increased product sales in the Consumer Domestic and Consumer International segments partially offset by lower SPD sales.  Lower price/mix in Consumer Domestic and SPD was partially offset by favorable price/mix in Consumer International.  Sales in the first quarter of 2012 were negatively impacted due to a timing shift in customer orders from the first quarter of 2012 to the fourth quarter of 2011 in anticipation of the January 1, 2012 information systems upgrade in the U.S.

Gross Profit

The Company’s gross profit for 2013 was $1,438.0, a $146.6 increase as compared to the same period in 2012 due primarily to contributions from its gummy dietary supplement business, higher sales volume and productivity improvement programs.  These increases were partially offset by higher trade promotion and an unfavorable product mix.  Commodity costs for the Company were unchanged in 2013 as compared to 2012.  Gross margin was 45.0% in 2013 as compared to 44.2% in 2012.  Gross margin was higher due to the positive impact of productivity improvement programs and higher sales volume, partially offset by higher trade promotion and coupon costs and unfavorable product mix.

Operating Costs

Marketing expenses for 2013 were $399.8, an increase of $42.5 as compared to 2012 due primarily to the gummy dietary supplement business, higher spending in support of certain power brands and new product launches.  Marketing expenses as a percentage of net sales were 12.5% in 2013 as compared to 12.2% in 2012.  

SG&A expenses for 2013 were $416.0, an increase of $27.0 as compared to 2012 due primarily to operating costs associated with the acquisition of the L’IL CRITTERS and VITAFUSION gummy dietary supplement business, higher research and development and compensation costs and intangible asset impairment charges, partially offset by lower legal expenses.  SG&A as a percentage of net sales was 13.0% in 2013 as compared to 13.3% in 2012.

Other Income and Expenses

Equity in earnings of affiliates for 2013 was $2.8 as compared to $8.9 in 2012.  The decrease is due primarily to an impairment charge recorded in the second quarter of 2013 associated with one of the Company’s affiliates and lower earnings from Armand as a result of increased raw material costs.

41


CHURCH & DWIGHT CO., INC AND SUBSIDIARIES

(Dollars in millions, except share and per share data)

 

Interest expense in 2013 increased $13.7 compared to 2012 principally due to debt incurred to finance the acquisition of the L’IL CRITTERS and VITAFUSION gummy dietary supplement business at the beginning of the fourth quarter of 2012 and interest associated with the financing lease obligation for the Company’s global headquarters that was fully occupied in January 2013.  

Taxation

The 2013 tax rate was 34.0% as compared to 35.5% in 2012.  The effective tax rate for 2013 was favorably affected by a lower effective state tax rate and tax benefits relating to the federal research tax credit for 2013 and the retroactive extension of the federal research tax credit to January 2012 that occurred in the first quarter of 2013.  The 2012 tax rate reflects no federal research tax credit.

Segment results for 2014, 2013 and 2012

The Company operates three reportable segments: Consumer Domestic, Consumer International and SPD.  These segments are determined based on differences in the nature of products and organizational and ownership structures.  The results of the Lil Drug Store Brands Acquisition are reflected in the Consumer Domestic and Consumer International segments.  The Company also has a Corporate segment.

 

Segment

Products

Consumer Domestic

Household and personal care products

Consumer International

Primarily personal care products

SPD

Specialty chemical products

The Corporate segment income consists of equity in earnings (losses) of affiliates.  As of December 31, 2014, the Company held 50% ownership interests in each of Armand and ArmaKleen, respectively, and a one-third ownership interest in Natronx.  The Company’s equity in earnings (losses) of Armand, ArmaKleen and Natronx for the twelve months ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012 is included in the Corporate segment.  

Some of the subsidiaries that are included in the Consumer International segment manufacture and sell personal care products to the Consumer Domestic segment.  These sales are eliminated from the Consumer International segment results set forth below.

Segment net sales and income before income taxes for each of the three years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012 were as follows:

 

 

 

Consumer

 

 

Consumer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Domestic

 

 

International

 

 

SPD

 

 

Corporate(3)

 

 

Total

 

Net Sales(1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014

 

$

2,471.6

 

 

$

535.2

 

 

$

290.8

 

 

$

0.0

 

 

$

3,297.6

 

2013

 

 

2,413.5

 

 

 

532.8

 

 

 

248.0

 

 

 

0.0

 

 

 

3,194.3

 

2012

 

 

2,156.9

 

 

 

510.1

 

 

 

254.9

 

 

 

0.0

 

 

$

2,921.9

 

Income before Income Taxes(2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014

 

$

502.8

 

 

$

64.7

 

 

$

45.8

 

 

$

11.6

 

 

$

624.9

 

2013

 

 

501.0

 

 

 

64.5

 

 

 

29.5

 

 

 

2.8

 

 

 

597.8

 

2012

 

 

428.8

 

 

 

71.0

 

 

 

33.8

 

 

 

8.9

 

 

 

542.5

 

(1)

Intersegment sales from Consumer International to Consumer Domestic, which are not reflected in the table, were $1.9, $2.2 and $3.4 for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

(2)

In determining income before income taxes, the Company allocated interest expense, investment earnings, and other income (expense) among the segments based upon each segment’s relative Income from Operations.

(3)

Corporate segment consists of equity in earnings (losses) of affiliates from Armand, ArmaKleen and Natronx.

42


CHURCH & DWIGHT CO., INC AND SUBSIDIARIES

(Dollars in millions, except share and per share data)

 

Product line revenues for external customers for the years ended December 31, 2014, 2013 and 2012 were as follows:

 

 

 

2014

 

 

2013

 

 

2012

 

Household Products

 

$

1,466.2

 

 

$

1,436.1

 

 

$

1,411.3

 

Personal Care Products

 

 

1,005.4

 

 

 

977.4

 

 

 

745.6

 

Total Consumer Domestic

 

 

2,471.6

 

 

 

2,413.5

 

 

 

2,156.9

 

Total Consumer International

 

 

535.2

 

 

 

532.8

 

 

 

510.1

 

Total SPD

 

 

290.8

 

 

 

248.0

 

 

 

254.9

 

Total Consolidated Net Sales

 

$

3,297.6

 

 

$

3,194.3

 

 

$

2,921.9

 

Household Products include deodorizing, cleaning and laundry products.  Personal Care Products include condoms, pregnancy kits, oral care products, skin care products and gummy dietary supplements.

Consumer Domestic

2014 compared to 2013

Consumer Domestic net sales in 2014 were $2,471.6, an increase of $58.1 or 2.4% compared to net sales of $2,413.5 in 2013.  The components of the net sales change are the following:

 

 

 

December 31,

 

Net Sales - Consumer Domestic

 

2014

 

Product volumes sold

 

 

3.5

%

Pricing/Product mix

 

 

(1.5

%)

Acquired product lines(1)